French Fry Question

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by icgsteve, Sep 19, 2011.

  1. icgsteve

    icgsteve

    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    I am working on a business plan for a small fast casual comfort food place. I want to do fresh fries. The other fried food on the menu is beer batter fish,  chicken tenders and onion ring. The tender has some parm in breading, the onion ring is cracker meal coated. I plan to have one fryer dedicated for the par cook and one for the final cook. 

    The questions: are the other three fried food items going to flavor my oil too much to run fries through that fryer? If so would you need to get a third fryer or would you make do with trying to use one one fryer for the fries and blanching several sheet pans at a time, leave them in a speed rack, and then turn the temp up thus leaving the second fryer for the other items? Also, is putting a little shredded parm in the breading a dumb idea for any reason? I worked in a place where we did an oven fried chicken with parm but I have never tried to put it in the fryer. 

    Thank you
     
  2. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

    Messages:
    7,404
    Likes Received:
    633
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    I think you can get away with 2 fryers.  Use one for the proteins and one for the veggies.  For par cooked fries you par cook them before service begins and let them cool, and cook them again a la minute.  Therefore you can use that same fryer for them.
     
  3. chefhow

    chefhow

    Messages:
    843
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I think your problem is going to be more with oil degredation than anything else.  Bread, cheese, potatoes all break down oil VERY quickly while also imparting flavors.  What I would suggest is to try and par boil your french fries and cool them a day ahead of time, gets rid of some of the protiens that break down the oil and leaves you with a creamy interior and a crunchy exterior a la McD's while not burning them like many end up doing at home.  Use one fryer ONLY for your FF's and the other for everything else, it will cut down on wasted fry oil and keep the flavors out of your fries.
     
  4. french fries

    french fries

    Messages:
    5,235
    Likes Received:
    339
    Exp:
    At home cook
    I thought it was going to be a question for me.... /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
     
  5. icgsteve

    icgsteve

    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    Thanks to those above....does anyone have guidance on the advisability of using a bit of Parm Cheese in breading of fryer foods? My concerns are that it will cause too much browning and destroy the oil faster, but I have never tried it and I dont have a place right now. I can find home cook recipes that call  for doing this but that does not mean that it works in the restaurant. 
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2011
  6. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    177
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Your big problem here is the breaking down of the fat. Try not to buy the cheapest one, buy the best one it last longer and long term cost less.

         All the items you are frying are high liquid, that kills the fat.. As far as imparting flavors, no matter what you do this will slightly happen. In fact Nathans Famous in Coney Island used to  fry raw onions in the fat before the fries., as they felt it improved the taste.

           The cheese will cause fat to brown faster. You dont need it. I would suggest straining fat daily and turn down temps in off time. As someone above mentioned steaming fries or boiling day prior is good idea(more work but pays off)  Same thing with chicken (almost all commercial fried chicken is steamed first  )

          Fish will flavor anything so try and put together a batter that seals quick possibly add some cornstarch. You have a lot of experimenting ahead but good luck.
     
  7. icgsteve

    icgsteve

    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    I expect to cut and triple wash the fries, and then let them soak in the cooler over night. It is interesting what you say about water content, as years ago I was told that fries should be soaked in salt water just so that some of the water is removed, but it does not look to me like modern operators use salt water, they use fresh water. Does anyone know if this is true, and if so why? 
     
  8. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

    Messages:
    2,270
    Likes Received:
    206
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    First of all, icgSteve, you need a real good spanking on your bare a$$...

    If you're taking your ambition serious, you should know by now that there's no such thing as "french" fries. They are Belgian.

    Anyway, I'll try to help a bit if I can.

    We have "friteries" in the smallest villages and they are now controlled quite often and heavily by the government on hygienic rules.

    The basis of those rules are written down in a guide that is made by the national union of friturist Navefri. I have no idea if they are able to give you a good answer on your questions in english, but you could contact them. I would guess they will suggest that you get over here and learn the business from another friturist. Happens all the time! They may even bring you in contact with a skilled friturist for a hands-on training?

    Here's the union's website, there's an e-mail adress to be found; http://  www.navefri-unafri.be/

    You could even learn to become a real pro. There's a 1 year training available to become a friturist. Costs 350€. Very intensive, also organisational and commercial aspects teached.

    http://www.syntrawest.be/opleidingen/horeca_en_voeding/horeca/frituuruitbater.html

    What to do with the fat and change it, can even be answered by the appliances available. Take a look at this "machine": 3 pots to fry the potatoes, 2 baskets for other things. I know these guys organise training too, you could ask; http://www.perfectafrit.be/producten.php?product=pre

    Found this thing on the internet. It's about starting a fries franchise...; http://www.belgianfries.com/bfblog/?p=1849

    I know there is/was a succesful Belgian friterie in New York, but I don't know them personally. Google came up with this; http://www.pommesfrites.ws/

    This is as far as my help goes since I'm still so very mad with you... It's Belgian fries!!
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2011
  9. chefhow

    chefhow

    Messages:
    843
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I would reccomend frying your food and then using a Parm based topical seasoning to finish the item.  Not burn to the cheese, no flavor loss or impating of flavor to the oil and you can use a higher quality cheese in the "finish" step.

    As to soaking, the reason to soak is to get the starch out before you put them in the oil.  This does 2 things, it saves your oil(keeps costs down) and it makes for a crispy exterior/creamy interior fry.  Both are EXTREMELY desirable from an operational and customer view point.