French cooking

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Joined Jun 7, 2021
French food, like all foods, derived as food for the ordinary people. Such classics as Coe Au Vin were methods for taking an old, tough chicken, and cooking it in a way to make it tender and flavorful. The same is true of cassoulet, Pot-au-feu, roulade, and a host of other, now famous French recipes. The recipes that set France apart from mn
any other countries is their mother, and daughter sauces, again used to elevate ordinary foods into something special, their pastries, and deserts. These have been developed with great, painstaking care, and attention to detail. That being said, there are equally great foods from every nation on the planet.
Over time, many of the foods have crossed boundaries, i.e. roulade (Fr), rouladen (German), Marinara (Italy), Sauce Tomate (Fr), potatoes, tomatoes, maple, beans, chilis, now found all over the world.
People used what was available to them. In the Americas, it was bison, antelope, elk, deer, fresh water, fish, and coastal seafood. In Africa, it was water buffalo, gazelle, and whatever they could successfully hunt. It's true of people, no matter where they come from. France is famous for its rich food traditions. If you don't care for French food, choose another. But give credit where credit is due, They made the best foods they could with available ingredients, and opened the world to many sublime sauces, and deserts as well.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

kuan

Moderator
Staff member
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Joined Jun 11, 2001
Actually I'm just disappointed at the lack of proper technique, and lack of proper use of proper cuts, lack of use of the whole animal. People bring in sides of salmon instead of the whole fish. I get it if you don't want to use the head, but what about the scrapings? where did they go?

French cooking isn't always about the food either. It's about the craft, the routine, of running a kitchen. The way food is stored, the way it is pre-prepped, as in taken care of as it walks in the kitchen. Peel your potatoes, put them in water, wash your carrots, peel your onions, and of course ice the fish, break down the chicken and ice your chicken parts, stuff like that. I don't think I've seen a restaurant in my area which required any of this. Of course I'm just looking at menus. Who knows what might be happening back of house.
 
267
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Joined Sep 21, 2010
Actually I'm just disappointed at the lack of proper technique, and lack of proper use of proper cuts, lack of use of the whole animal. People bring in sides of salmon instead of the whole fish. I get it if you don't want to use the head, but what about the scrapings? where did they go?

French cooking isn't always about the food either. It's about the craft, the routine, of running a kitchen. The way food is stored, the way it is pre-prepped, as in taken care of as it walks in the kitchen. Peel your potatoes, put them in water, wash your carrots, peel your onions, and of course ice the fish, break down the chicken and ice your chicken parts, stuff like that.
My daughter worked FOH at a top French restaurant. She loves food and cooking, and was thrilled when Chef showed her how to break down whole halibut, salmon & pork, and even now, she lectures me when I break down proteins lol.

Their pork was from Chef's farm, as was much of the fruit and veg. Beef, chicken and pretty much everything else were from local farmers, Sounds expensive, but he said he save $$ by buying salted instead of unsalted butter.

Chef believed that all staff were part of the team. Although she was a server, she learned a lot in that kitchen, and was able to bring that knowledge to the diners when they had questions. She also made a heck of a lot in tips (which they shared with BOH).

One thing about keeping salmon in ice -- one cold day, I saw a couple of tubs of salmon on ice out on the restaurant's back porch. It was close to Christmas, no doubt the kitchen was pretty full, and the salmon wouldn't have stayed out there very long.
 

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