Freezing peeled garlic

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by happy cooker, Mar 30, 2011.

  1. happy cooker

    happy cooker

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    Does any one know of a good way to freeze peeled garlic?  There are just two of us and I find that the expiration date rolls around before I've used the garlic.  I started buying the peeled because it is made in Gilroy, CA and the rest of it seems to be imported from China.  I want to support our garlic capitol of the world but it's rather a lot and I end up pitching half of it out.

    Thanks in advance for your suggestions.  
     
  2. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    You're very right not to use that imported stuff when you have access to better garlic!

    Maybe this will help, it's a method I also use to store fresh ginger, also something that ends up in the garbage.

    It's dead simple and when you look back to your white truffle oil thread, you will find some similarities...

    To freez ginger I peel and grate a lot of it over a large plate. I now have nothing else than pulp and juice. Mix it a little and then put some of that in the lower part of a plastic bag. Fold the upper half of the plastic bag over to the bottom and lay down folded like that. Now gently tap on the ginger to spread the grated ginger all over only the lower half of the bag in a thin layer. Don't make it thicker than 3 mm. Lay the package like that in your freezer. Now you can simply break off what you need.

    I would suggest to do the same with garlic. Peel and grate or process in a foodprocessor and make similar thin layers in folded plastic bags.

    Also same method for making truffle butter; grate truffle, add softened butter, bag as above!

    Here's some left-over frozen ginger (don't mind the onion). You'll use your frozen stuff to the very last bit without waste and most important; without loss of taste!

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2011
  3. happy cooker

    happy cooker

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    Chris to the rescue again- with a photo and a detailed explanation.  Can't ask for more than that!

    Since they're already pealed, I'll just put them in the food processor and follow your instructions.

    Thank you for sharing your knowledge with me.  I'm trying to buy food that is made here instead of being forced to buy something that is shipped on a slow boat from China and certainly can't be fresh when it arrives.  Who knows how long it sits waiting to be distributed to the stores.  

    I wrote to the grower and received this response that I thought I'd share with you:


    [font=Geneva, Verdana, Helvetica, Arial]Thank you for contacting us. You can freeze peeled cloves but they may turn mushy when thawed. Most of the flavor remains, but you won’t have chunks of garlic. If the bag has been opened, make sure you get all the air out of the bag and seal it completely before freezing. Best to double bag it also to keep the "aroma" from traveling. It should be good for 3 to 6 months in the freezer. Freezing in an air tight container, zip lock bag or vacuum sealed bag are also good options. 

    If you decide not to freeze it, make sure you keep it constantly refrigerated at fairly cold temperatures, (34º to 38º is best). FYI: Our favorite suggestion is to share your garlic with family or friends. Peeled garlic stores well in a zip lock bag as long as it’s constantly refrigerated.

    We hope these hints are helpful. Thank you for being a customer. We appreciate your support!
    [/font]


     Christopher Ranch

    California Grown • Heirloom Garlic

    Our BLOG for GARLIC news, views and RECIPES: 
    http://christopherranch.wordpress.com/
     
  4. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    Why not just keep 2-3  bulbs in the pantry?  Always fresh...........
     
  5. frostheim

    frostheim

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    Peeled garlic is much more convenient.
     
  6. happy cooker

    happy cooker

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    Because they're from China and they're not fresh in the first place.