Freezing Cheese

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by dagger, Apr 27, 2016.

  1. dagger

    dagger

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    I'm not talking Kraft but real European cheeses. Just bought British Cheese Assortment from Igourmet.com  Collier's Cheddar,  Royal Blue Stilton, Sage Derby & Cotswold which come vacuum sealed in bags so would freezing this kind of I'm guessing hard cheese hurt it? I have cheddar from igourmet in my cold cut draw for pretty close to a year with no problems when opened the cheese is fine also have the 2 type of cheese with truffles in freezer so does it matter. I have frozen Kraft cheese and it's turned out ok when opened so I'm guessing this will be fine. BTY: if you order from Igourmet.com include the $1 for their cooler, it's best soft one ever had.

    http://www.igourmet.com/shoppe/British-Cheese-Assortment.asp
     
  2. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    Why would you want to freeze this? It's only two pounds, you bought it to eat so eat it.
     
  3. dagger

    dagger

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    not right away, bought it because it was a variety. About freezing, saw something on YouTube about freezing cheese the women said USDA recommends breaking the pouch seal when defrosting vacummed sealed foods, is this true? Never done it that way
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2016
  4. maryb

    maryb

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    Freezing will make the texture more crumbly, and yes when you thaw open the seal so the moisture that was pulled to the surface of the cheese can go back inside. I love cheddar and buy big 2 pound blocks of Cabot extra sharp white cheddar. I cut it into thirds and vacuum bag 2 and freeze until I need it. Great cheese for burgers, tacos, munching...
     
  5. dagger

    dagger

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    you guys who own restaurants are used to buying on a daily bases but the rest of us buy in bulk and save for later use, that why a Foodsaver. I'm looking forward to making some interesting tasting mac & cheese or veggies with these different cheeses.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2016
  6. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Contrary to what I might think, I am not always at work. At home I don't buy in bulk, more like a week's worth at most. My freezer has ice in it and that's about it.
     
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  7. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Some of us are lucky enough to live in relatively affluent urban areas and have access to one or more local shops for gourmet items. Buying in bulk is seldom necessary. I wasn't always blessed with that opportunity and, then, found myself more oriented toward the local fare(all the while trying to stay at the upper extremes of the local offerings) and not even trying to procure the gourmet ingredients from afar. First, it was very costly; Second, it often arrived in poor condition; and finally, it didn't often store well over time and became a totally frustrating experience and a complete waste of money.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2016
  8. dagger

    dagger

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    Wondering how do you enjoy your cheese? Mostly I use a ritz cracker which is ok for cheese wiz but this stuff should go with something more special. Making mac & cheese from scrach or veggies with cheese is new to me. There's only 2 here and I'm the only one interested in cheese other than kraft.
     
  9. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Primarily on a Carr's Water Cracker. Rarely on other crackers. Cheeses in the Blue family occasionally on a thin slice of ripe pair or tart apple. Brie family on lightly toasted baguette... But sometimes on a piece of ripe tomato.... And sometimes all 3 combined into a sandwich.
     
  10. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    If the desire is for a savory side dish rather than app or cheese course I never shy away from a well-made mac&cheese, or potato au gratin, or a basic cheese sauce to slather over vegetable. One of my families favorites is when I steam a whole cauliflower and engulf it in a cheese sauce or mustard sauce - neither being much more than a basic bechamel with a goodly amount of cheese and onion or mustard and onion. A very simple family-style side dish that tastes Good, and they enjoy the drama of diving into a whole vegetable.

    Or theirs always the cheesy twice baked potato to consider!
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2016
  11. dagger

    dagger

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    I have seen apple pie with cheddar cheese but never tried it. Never seen it sold anyplace near me.
     
  12. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    That's a tradition I didn't discover until I was a teen. A local diner always said "a piece of apple pie without a slice of cheese is like a kiss without a hug"... Or something quite similar. Maybe that's a Midwest tradition; IDK.
     
  13. cerise

    cerise Banned

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    When it comes to dairy products, I pretty much buy what I need for a week or so.

    If you Google freezing cheese, there are many articles with tips, what kind of cheeses freeze well, expiration dates,
    etc.

    This week plain old sliced muenster cost $3.69 for 8 oz. Are cows on strike in California, or are they feeding them Caviar? The grocery bill seems to be getting higher. And higher. I recently froze a pkg of turkey breast on sale for $2.50. Will see if the texture/taste is any good.
     
  14. maryb

    maryb

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  15. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    The internet is full of tips and suggestions regarding the freezing of cheese.  I find that only semi-hard and hard cheeses freeze without being completely destroyed, but my general rule of thumb is that I don't freeze any cheese that I plan on eating as is.  In other words, I will only freeze cheeses that I plan on cooking with, not eating straight up.  I have found that really is no need to freeze cheese, usually.  Unless you are buying in a cheese shop, the chances are it is coming in a cryo-vac sealed pouch.  Leaving it un-opened it will last for months (this is for semi-hard and hard cheeses only).  And even opened I can usually get a week or more out of cheese before I start to see surface mold.  Soft cheeses, on the other hand, need to be eaten up pretty quickly as they have a tendency to get over ripe within a couple of weeks.