Freeze dried herbs?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by developingtaste, Mar 17, 2015.

  1. developingtaste

    developingtaste

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    The wife and I have a habit of freezing a couple herbs when we are done with it's fresh useage, to preserve that freshness.  Most often we do this with cilantro.  Making home toco shells and fixings is delicious and fun, and cilantro adds the authentic flavour we enjoy.  That's just one of our uses of freeze dried cilantro.  Some herbs are better lefted to dry out, and continue to use that way, so I know this doesn't apply to all herbs equally.  I was wondering if any of you froze your fresh herbs?

    Which are the herbs you do that with as well??
     
  2. dantech

    dantech

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    I have a little garden with basil, cilantro, coriander, oregano, and parsley.

    A few week before winter starts, I chop up these herbs individually, and put one tablespoon inside an icecube tray filled with water.

    Anytime I need a tablespoon of any herb, I pop out a cube, and there you go! 
     
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  3. pepper grind

    pepper grind

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    My sister portions her dill out then puts them in an Ice cube tray to throw into soups and such, whereas I get rid of most of the moisture with a paper towel then cut it up into bits so I can freeze in a baggie and easily grab in a pinch for my baked potato.
     
  4. developingtaste

    developingtaste

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    What do you use with the dill besides baked potatoe?  What kind of flavor does it bring to the food?  Do you try to compliment it with another spice/herb, or is it a stand alone type flavor?

    My experience with dill is store bought dill pickles.  Sad, I know.
     
  5. mike9

    mike9

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    Salmon, cream cheese, in fact roll smoked salmon and dilled cream cheese in some crescent roll dough and bake - delicious.  It also works well in salads including a pinch in egg salad.  Potato salad especially German potato salad.  Think man think - /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif  

    BUT - I took a friends advice and dried herbs in the microwave last year and it works like a champ.  You can youtube it probably.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2015
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  6. french fries

    french fries

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    I also do that with parsley. I conserve chopped parsley in a small glass jar in my freezer. When I need a bit for a hot dish, such as sautéed potatoes, I can open the jar, take a few pinches and place the jar back in the freezer. 

    Here herbs are a bit expensive, but when you buy a bunch it's huge. So freezing some is always a good idea. 
     
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  7. pepper grind

    pepper grind

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    I don't think it's sad at all, and there ain't nothing wrong with pickles! Mike9 and French Fries pretty much called it. I found the ice cube trick handy for soups and lend well to cool down, but for other things I personally prefer sprinkling frozen sprigs. Learned also that chopping too fine will remove a bit of flavor.

    I think it might be a water content/texture thing with me.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2015
  8. chefross

    chefross

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    I freeze basil, tarragon, marjoram, summer savory, chives, and sage.

    I use mini muffin tins with a tablespoon of each topped off with either water or stock.

    Dill bunches goes into small baggies, and frozen as is.
     
  9. genemachine

    genemachine

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    Just as an aside, freezing is not freeze-drying. Freeze drying involves shock freezing at very low temperatures, preferably with liquid nitrogen, and sublimating the water under vacuum.
     
  10. pepper grind

    pepper grind

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    I never actually looked it up myself, so my bet is on you. I use a process for dough filled savory treats like wontons that keep them from sticking together before portioning them into a container or ziplock.

    What I do is place them on a baking tray with parchment, space them out for a few minutes in the freezer, then store. I always thought this method was referred to as shocking. I wonder now if this is considered poor practice, or if there is another name for it?

    I considered trying the baking sheet trick with herbs, but wasn't sure if the water content would make it a little soggy.

    I'm also fresh out of liquid nitrogen. (;