For our canadian friends

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by cape chef, Jun 19, 2001.

  1. cape chef

    cape chef

    Messages:
    4,508
    Likes Received:
    32
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I can't help but notice that Cheftalk is attracting many folk from up north "Canada"

    My question is, What are you seeing as far as culinary trends,slow foods,chef and farmers working together.Whats "Hot" and whats "Not"? When I look at a map of your wonderful country I can't believe how vast it is,Not unlike the states..you must have distinct cuisines from one end to another.

    Who are the hot Chefs?
    What are the hot places to go?

    I look forward to your insights
    Thanks
    cc
     
  2. 84rhonda

    84rhonda

    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    10
    Wow that's quite a compliment for us Canadians. I can't speak for my country since I don't have much elegant dining experience. But in Montreal, the dining is very diverse. You can enjoy lebanese cuisine, Greek, italian, chinese, vietnamese. Montreal is really well known for it's multiculture so hence you'll see a lot of diff cuisines. Japanese food seems to be the hot ticket at the moment (so I've heard). As far as who's hot right now, maybe someone with more elegant dining experience or who's in the business could answer that.
    But from my limited experience, I really enjoyed TREEHOUSE in Montreal, the only place in Montreal that I know that serves up KOBE beef. :eek:
     
  3. svadhisthana

    svadhisthana

    Messages:
    579
    Likes Received:
    10
    What a wonderful idea for a topic, CC. I'm interested to learn more as well. Thank you for sharing Rhonda
     
  4. anneke

    anneke

    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Culinary Instructor
    One chef in Toronto is exceptionally hot property right know: Susur Lee. Absolut Vodka even did an " Absolut Susur" ad for him. He did fusion long before it was called fusion. His dishes are fab, and he presents his dishes as one would royal jewels. Haven't had the patience or the $ to get on his guest list yet...

    Up here fusion is definitely fizzing out. Contemporary traditional, as they like to call it is kicking in. We are seeing a great deal of effort being placed by several chefs in attempting to define Canadian cuisine. They like using Odjibway (sp?) wild rice, Saskatoon berries, Ontario spring lamb, Alberta grain pilaf, Brôme duck, Cookstown seedlings and sprouts, (see the trend?) etc etc etc.. Some say defining our cuisine is futile; like our culture, it's Canadian because there isn't anything really genuinely 100% canadian. It's a real mix of so many heritages. I think that may be true but we should keep trying because it yields beautiful results. One good example is chef Michael Smith. Very interesting results indeed.

    There's a lot of really great stuff happening up here and I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that consumers are becoming quite knowledgeable thanks to the food network and the proliferation of food related media. It's an exciting time to be a chef!
     
  5. coolj

    coolj

    Messages:
    732
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    There is actually quite a variety, something I've never thought about. but I'm sitting here, and I was trying to write a post about canadian cuisine, and when I started to write I was just like wow !! there is so much I've taken for granted. I mean in BC alone the cultural differences are very different, in the Greater Vancouver area they eat alot of seafood and I know up along the sunshine coast they get so much crabs and other seafood, that it's too much. In Kamloops the biggest thing is Beef, because we are basically a farm town when it comes down to the nitty gritty, but whats really cool is that we have a local dairy that provides all of our grocery stores and we also have a local egg farm that provide our stores with fresh eggs. If a person were to go up north to Prince George, Smithers, etc... you find alot more moose and bear meat being used. so I have to say thank you CC, for bring this topic up.
     
  6. coolj

    coolj

    Messages:
    732
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I just realized, that I didn't answer the questions about who are the hot chefs and where at the hot places to go. In my opinion in Kamloops, and I've said this before, Monte Bell is the man is this town, we used to have a chef at the Coast Canadian Inn byt the name of Thomas Mayerhofer, but I think he moved away, and some of the stuff he did was just amazing. There's also Helmut Mathae (culinary olympic medallist), he's the executive chef at the Plaza Hotel. Down at the coast one of the hot spots I've heard of, never actually been to, is called Diva at the Met, it's in the Metropolitan Hotel, the chef there is Michael Noble, and I believe he also competed on Iron Chef. another hot spot right now, ok theres a couple, they're both in Kelowna, one is the Okanagan Grand Hotel, and the other place is called the Cheesecake Cafe.
     
  7. kimmie

    kimmie

    Messages:
    2,550
    Likes Received:
    12
    Click here for Michael Smith.

    Great post Anneke!
     
  8. isa

    isa

    Messages:
    3,236
    Likes Received:
    10
    We do love food, must be our latin side. It would be hard to say what the future holds for us food wise. Guess the best thing is to look at what there is right now. I am sure the first steps towards the future have already been taken.. Who said if you want to know the future look at the past?


    It is easy to noticed that people are more concern with what they eat now, most likely this awareness is due to all the talk we hear about genetically modified food. It can only improve the quality of the food that is available and we do have a lot of food.


    There are three big public market in Montreal. In addition there are numeral marchés de quartier, meaning little market in different area of the city. Unfortunately these markets are not necessarily selling local produce. I know the summer is hot in Montreal but I have yet to see local banana trees. You can wonder if people go to the market because it is the in place to shop or to get fresher produces.


    In any case, nothing beats a trip to the market, the choices of produces is constantly growing. Plus you can find zebra tomatoes, yellow beets and purple potatoes fairly easily. The farmers are always willing to share their knowledge with you. It’s great to have someone willing to advice and you and teach you all about the different varieties of fruits and vegetables. There are now some organic or biologic butcher shop and one producers sells only organic certified produces.


    There are a great number of street known for its food stores. The most popular one is St- Laurent, known as la Main because it is the street that divides the city in East and West. Laurier is another street with lots of nice food boutique but it’s more expensive, snob, fashionable? I don’t know you just have to see it.


    There is an impressive quantity of ethnic restaurants and groceries in Montreal. We have a Chinatown, where you’ll find lots of dim sum and Schezuan restaurants. A petite Italie with lots of Italian stores and restaurants. There is no other official little country yet but you we have Latinos, Jamaican, Arab, Asian groceries and restaurants. I am sure I am missing some.


    I am sure others will want to add to this. I look forward to reads their thoughts on the subject.
     
  9. kimmie

    kimmie

    Messages:
    2,550
    Likes Received:
    12
    Montreal is a city that loves and respects food. We demand that it be fresh and well-prepared.

    Eating out in Montreal means classic dining in classic restaurants. The city's large population of immigrants from all over the world have brought other styles of cooking with them, so the choice - French, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Thai, Greek, and countless others- is endless.

    Though the organic scene in Montreal and in Quebec as a whole has increased exponentially in the past years, cooks who want to cook locally in this area have to work very hard at picking, preserving and storing for the winter months. Chef David McMillan (Globe) and Normand Laprise (Toqué!) do their utmost to cook in a way that promotes the idea of locality and seasonality. They constantly search for the freshest in local ingredients, as well as the best local organic produce.

    Amongst my favorites are:

    Toqué!
    The name Toqué may mean 'crazy', but the food is definitely top notch. Serving some of the most interesting dishes in Montréal, chefs Normand Laprise and Christine Lamarche produce an enviable menu. Inarguably the best and most exciting restaurant in Montreal, Toqué has all the right trimmings (great service, fabulous wine list, priceless cachet), but it remains a champion because it has never wavered from the most important task of an expensive eatery: to provide astounding, unforgettable, truly masterly food. Chef/co-owner Norman Laprise regales with flawless, highly-innovative "new" Quebec cuisine and amazing desserts. Toqué is worth a pilgrimage: once a year is minimum for the good of the soul.
    I thought it would be fun to display their logo for you--

    [​IMG]

    La Queue de Cheval is a steakhouse notable for its décor, excellent service and first class kitchen. Twelve different choices of steak cuts including their famous rib eye (Delmonico cut), veal and roast prime rib. Selection of fresh fish and lobster from the market.

    Le Passe-Partout(French)-- Honorary member of 'Sommeliers du Canada' and member of the Distinguished Restaurant of North America, le Passe-Partout chef James MacGuire, won the prestigious 'Étoile Gastronomique' in 1998. A small, but regularly changing, menu may include some of their home-made pâtés and terrines, smoked salmon, veal or swordfish steak, all accompanied by some of the best homebaked bread in Montréal.

    As far as trends come and go, Thai, Japanese and Indian are very hot at this time.

    P.S.: I didn't mention that Caribbean and Jamaican food are also very popular here...and in my kitchen!

    If you live in NYC, the good new is that Chef Laprise commutes weekly to New York to his new restaurant, Cena, in the city's Flat Iron District.

    Cena, 12 E. 22nd Street, (212) 505-1222, New American cooking in a sleek setting.

    Reviews

    Here

    or here


    Thanks CC for this thread.

    :p

    [ June 21, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
     
  10. kimmie

    kimmie

    Messages:
    2,550
    Likes Received:
    12
    Wow Iza, great post. It's funny though, while you were writing about markets, I was writing about restaurants.

    Both posts complement each other!

    :)

    [ June 22, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
     
  11. isa

    isa

    Messages:
    3,236
    Likes Received:
    10
    Kimmie what a coincidence, over dinner I realised I didn't say much about restaurants and you so nicely covered that part.


    One last thought, for the last few years there has been a new industry developing in Quebec called tables champetres or country style dinning. It is available on a few select farms. Reservation are require and it is always for groups, usually 4 to 10 persons. In each of those farms you’ll be served a gourmet dinner based on the products that are at the base of the farm. Some raised rabbits so your meal will be built around that. Each farms offers its own specialities. This formula works specially well during the summer and it gives city people an occasion to discover new foods.


    For more information: http://www.agricotours.qc.ca/
     
  12. kimmie

    kimmie

    Messages:
    2,550
    Likes Received:
    12
    Thanks Iza.

    Or visit La route des saveurs

    Find and click on Agrotourism listed on the left part of the screen.

    Bilingual information.

    [ June 22, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
     
  13. cape chef

    cape chef

    Messages:
    4,508
    Likes Received:
    32
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    This is wonderful imformation!!!

    Thank you all for such detailed and helpful posts.

    I surely must make it up north and viset your wonderful communities.
    cc
     
  14. kimmie

    kimmie

    Messages:
    2,550
    Likes Received:
    12
    Thanks CC.

    Make sure to announce your arrival by PM to your Montreal friends!

    :p

    [ June 22, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
     
  15. cape chef

    cape chef

    Messages:
    4,508
    Likes Received:
    32
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Without a dought :)
    cc :p
     
  16. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

    Messages:
    9,204
    Likes Received:
    65
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    This is really welcome information. Thanks to you all for sharing with those of us from 'down south'. Kimmie, I thought it interesting that La Queue de Cheval serves steak- which I usually assume is beef. Please reassure me it's not horse... ;)
     
  17. kimmie

    kimmie

    Messages:
    2,550
    Likes Received:
    12
    I remember Le Horse Tartare, Anneke. Personally, I love horsemeat! and yes, Anneke, it's closed!!!

    Mez,

    Calm down, sugar, the steak is beef meat at La Queue de Cheval!

    :eek:
     
  18. anneke

    anneke

    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Culinary Instructor
    Mezz,
    Horse meat is still served in Montreal especially in Belgian restaurants (Kimmie, remember Le Witloof and their horse tartar?). When I lived there, there was a boucherie chevaline which was pretty good but because of slower demand, I wouldn't be surprised if it has closed. I had all kinds of weird foods as a kid, so things like veal tongue or horse meat (fillet d'Anverse) doesn't gross me out at all - it's actually lean and tasty- but I can understand the general hesitancy of consumers... The way I see it, Cows are just as cute as horses, especially those that are bread for their meat. :p
     
  19. kimmie

    kimmie

    Messages:
    2,550
    Likes Received:
    12
    I couldn't resist, just found cool pics of my favorite restaurant, Toqué!

    Click here


    ;)