food truck

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by ldiatone, Sep 8, 2017.

  1. ldiatone

    ldiatone

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    all of a sudden things happen. kid wants to start a bussiness ...on her own but has to ask me for advice. BUT now i might have a opportunity to get into a FOOD TRUCK. i am RETIRED
     
  2. ldiatone

    ldiatone

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    hit enter by mistake. i do not have to worry about investment or money. i have been a country club chef for 30 years. so have been very versatile as far food-menus etc are concerned.. so question for chefs who do food trucks or have done them.
    what are your 3 most important things/items? truck is not a problem what is the most important cost? and as far as menu goes i think i can do menu.
    thanks
    chef john
     
  3. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    Get the biggest truck you can afford. Don't skimp on equipment, know your market.
     
  4. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    I don't think a food truck business is for the faint of heart and I would advise really considering the cost. Has your "kid" actually worked on a food truck? I would advise doing this for several months to get a feel for what it is all about. Few observations I have seen regarding food trucks. The trucks are expensive often as much as opening a small restaurant. Very limited prep and storage space. Either you have to have a separate prep location and someone who will handle prep while the truck is out selling. Or, you will have to prep in the down time. Storage seems like it is always an issue. In addition to this running a small restaurant on wheels you have to maintain a heavy Social Media presence. It takes a huge effort to run a food truck (more so than an actual restaurant in my opinion).
     
    fatcook likes this.
  5. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    fatcook, drirene and flipflopgirl like this.
  6. ldiatone

    ldiatone

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    thanks fellow chefs!
     
  7. CA714

    CA714

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    As previously mentioned, Food Trucks aren't for the faint of heart. I've used to own one in D.C. and it was very difficult with balancing so many factors. Understanding your customers and what they want is obviously given; however smaller things like serving times, parking situations, or running supplies are some of the constraints that I had dealt with most. Employees were also a problem as well because of the low profile compared to an established restaurant. Most employees would either come late or not even show up to work.

    As far as buying a food truck, you can certainly find one cheaper on craigslist. I would encourage you to buy a used food truck as there is no sense in pay 4x the cost for a newly renovated one. Just be wary that most converted food trucks are usually older and require maintenance. I've had my truck break down a couple times (damn diesel wouldn't startup). Also, study up on the regulations and vending guidance for your intended areas to serve. In D.C., you can only have a truck that is 18FT. long because of the parking constraints.
     
  8. ldiatone

    ldiatone

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    thanks but i think the getting a food truck just faded as the backer "backed out" and i am retired so i'll just pass. thanks for the answer and help... ps this backer a wanted new truck. i toured both used and new and used renovated. the last 2, 90,000 and up to 120,000. and i viewed on CL some for 40-50 thous. and what hurts have the menu all planed with 14 item which i was going to take down to 7-8-9. i did not want bbq pork sand as many do that here in LA. do you think a "Shredded Pork ala Parmigiana" sandwich would have worked??
    thanks again
    john
     
  9. chefsing

    chefsing

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    Permits/knowing where to find the customers at the right times are huge. Biggest cost overlooked I've noticed from fellow chefs: truck maintenance. If you do not know how to work on/fix the truck, you better have an employee or a really savvy friend to help maintain the engine/equipment/outward appearance, you could end up funneling a ton of money otherwise.