Food safety for chicken

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Joined Feb 26, 2017
Hi everyone,

I am new to cooking and I do need your help regarding food safety for raw chicken as I don't know how to judge this.

I wanted to marinate my chicken overnight and cook tomorrow. Therefore I washed it by soaking it with cold tape water for a while (less than 15 mins) which I know is not a good way to wash the meat after doing some research online. Next I rinsed it with cold water. I also accidentally rinsed it with warm water for a few seconds. I marinated it and now it's in my fridge.

Question: Is it still safe to cook and eat this chicken? Thanks so much!!
 
4,474
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Joined Jun 27, 2012
A couple of seconds of warm water shouldn't be a game changer as long as you seasoned and popped into fridge right away.

Welcome to Chef Talk as well......

mimi
 
3,318
739
Joined May 5, 2010
 
Hi everyone,

I am new to cooking and I do need your help regarding food safety for raw chicken as I don't know how to judge this.

I wanted to marinate my chicken overnight and cook tomorrow. Therefore I washed it by soaking it with cold tape water for a while (less than 15 mins) which I know is not a good way to wash the meat after doing some research online. Next I rinsed it with cold water. I also accidentally rinsed it with warm water for a few seconds. I marinated it and now it's in my fridge.

Question: Is it still safe to cook and eat this chicken? Thanks so much!!
Welcome to ChefTalk......

If you had done some research online you might have come across this:

Cooking will kill any bacteria present, including campylobacter, while washing chicken  can spread germs by splashing. Thoroughly wash  and clean all utensils, chopping boards and surfaces used to prepare raw chickenWash  hands thoroughly with soap and warm water after handling raw chicken
 
7,676
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Joined Apr 3, 2008
 
Welcome to ChefTalk......

If you had done some research online you might have come across this:

Cooking will kill any bacteria present, including campylobacter, while washing chicken  can spread germs by splashing. Thoroughly wash  and clean all utensils, chopping boards and surfaces used to prepare raw chickenWash  hands thoroughly with soap and warm water after handling raw chicken
Sure sure sure.  But here's the thing - I don't wash chicken (any meat actually) because I'm trying to wash off bacteria.  I wash it to remove debris!!!  Cooking will not kill a piece of plastic that was left on, or remove stray feathers, or remove any little bone fragments stuck to the flesh.  Therefore it must be washed.

The same thing could be said for any vegetable that you cook.  And yet we wash them.  Because debris.
 
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Joined Jan 31, 2012
Sure, its perfectly fine to dump that marinade into
a saute' pan and turn it into a mouthwatering sauce
or gravy. Which ive done many times, with many
different marinades. And once its cooked down for a few
minutes, you can baste with it too.
 
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Cooking will kill any bacteria present
Cooking will kill only active bacteria, but not the heat-resistant spores, nor the heat-stable toxins already created by bacteria, which means cooking your food doesn't make it automatically safe. The dormant bacteria will not be killed by cooking, and will be activated as your cooked food falls back into the danger zone. 

Some bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes (found in vegetables when manure was used as fertilizer, and in dairy products) can grow while in the fridge, and even survive minimum pasteurization times!
 
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Joined Jan 31, 2012
All true, and food micro biology is fascinating, I worked in a frzn food factory for a year in QC.

I think we're all pretty cautious about raw chicken, Im just saying Ive cooked literally thousands

of pieces of the little cluckers in various ways,both in catering and for me and family, and

have never had a problem im aware of. Im just careful about temps and cross contamination,

especially in the home, where various operations arent usually as separated as they are in a

commercial kitchen environment.

A big part of course is from where youre getting your chicken in the first place.
 
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Joined Aug 15, 2003
OP, this isn't meant to be derogatory towards you, but I genuinely don't understand how someone can think that rinsing a piece of chicken in warm water for a few seconds will harm anything. People are way too cautious with this stuff IMO. I mean, yes, take some precautions with food safety obviously, but not being hampered by things like rinsing for 5 seconds in warm water...

I personally do my chicken breasts at 138F sous vide for an hour and a half. BEAUTIFUL chicken...most tender juicy chicken I've had. My customers love it too!
 
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Joined Mar 1, 2017
Here are some tips to keep in mind when handling chicken

1)  If you must wash it - a few seconds under cold water will do

2) Wash everything it touches - hot water and soap.  The water should be as hot as you can stand it.  When it reaches the temp where you can barely stand it, make it a little hotter. 

3) Wash your hands each time after you handle the chicken.  So many people forget and touch other things like pot lids and handles, knives, the refrigerator door......you get the point.

4) If you are putting the chicken in a plastic bag to marinate or freeze, wash your hands BEFORE you seal the bag

5) If you use a knife or utensil on the raw chicken, only use that knife or utensil on the chicken.  If you only have one knife or utensil, see #2.  Make sure you wash the utensils before you use them on the cooked chicken.

6) Do not baste the chicken with the same marinade that it soaked in.  Make a separate batch.

7) Marinade your chicken in the fridge - 4 to 6 hours should be plenty of time, less if the marinade contains some form of acid such as citrus or vinegar (the acidity will actually begin to break down the chicken)

8) If you often prepare chicken, make it a point to have a cutting board dedicated exclusively for chicken.  I have one for non protein items (several, actually), one for red meats and pork, one for seafood and one for poultry. 

9) Familiarize yourself with the proper cleaning and care of your cutting boards

10) Wash everything (this one is so important, it has to be listed twice).

Your home state will probably offer some sort of food handling course.  They are usually free and usually offered on line.  If there is a fee for the course, its usually nominal.  In some states, you can't work in a commercial kitchen or handle food served to the public without one.  Even though working in a commercial kitchen or serving food to the public may not be your goal, the course will offer some very good information on food safety and handling. 

Good luck!  :)
 
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Joined May 25, 2015
 1)  Wash it - a few minutes under cold water will do
The health department warned us against washing chicken. Great way to spread bacteria all over the area and you. Just clean out the cavity with paper towels and pat the outside dry. That's all you have to do.
 
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Joined May 5, 2010
Reading all the posts so far has shown how diverse our knowledge of food safety and practices are.

Very revealing. 
 
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Joined Mar 1, 2017
Although the OP does not specify, I think the chicken that she wants to marinate are parts, not the whole bird. 

Otherwise, I agree that washing a whole bird with the exception of rinsing the cavity is really not necessary. 
 
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Joined Mar 1, 2017
 
The health department warned us against washing chicken. Great way to spread bacteria all over the area and you. Just clean out the cavity with paper towels and pat the outside dry. That's all you have to do.
I think OP is talking about chicken parts, not the whole bird.  
 
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Joined May 25, 2015
Doesn't matter. In fact there is probably less of a necessity to wash the parts. If your chicken is that "skunky" you need to look for a better source.
 

norcalbaker59

Banned
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Joined Feb 16, 2017
I rinse meat (except ground meat) because I can't stand the bloody liquid that accumulates in the wrapper. With chicken, the cavity has bits of gut tissue that I also find unappetizing. So I rinse the cavity well. If I'm not going to truss, I cut off the neck and tail. I just rinsed and dried a chicken, covered it in a herb dry brine/rub. Put it back in the refrigerator uncovered. I'll roast it tomorrow. I've cooked chicken like this for years without an incident of foodborne illness. The only time I ever got sick from eating at home was a result of store bought cheese. Everyone in the family who ate the cheese got sick. Those who didn't eat it were fine.
 
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