Food: Does Size Matter?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by koukouvagia, Mar 26, 2014.

  1. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I grew up in a family of farmers and was taught that the smallest produce is the tastiest and kept it for ourselves.  Or maybe we kept the smallest ones so that we could sell the bigger ones since the price was determined by weight.  Either way, I've always approached produce looking for the smaller pieces especially when it comes to cucumbers, melons, carrots, zucchini and others.  So I was surprised when I looked in my fridge yesterday and found this monstrosity, hubby may have bought it on impulse. In my opinion something this big doesn't taste as good.  It's surprising when I shop with others who look for the biggest apples, the biggest longest celery, the biggest squash!

    I also  think that smaller quantities of food are easier to prepare and control in the kitchen.  It's not that I have a problem cooking big quantities but I think it's easier to get something right when it's smaller.  My pies, cakes, moussaka, spinach pies, pastitsio, lasagna and other casserole type dishes tend to also be short stacked with great quality ingredients and bursting of flavor rather than height and filler.  I'd rather make a spanakopita with a few bunches of fresh organic spinach than several pounds of frozen spinach.  I notice this is somewhat different than the way others cook but I'm certain I'm not alone.

     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2014
  2. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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  3. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    One word: Strawberries.

    The strawberries in the stores the past few years are humongous--and totally tasteless.
     
  4. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Sometimes when we visit Greece in the summertime I visit the farmers market and find these tiny little wild strawberries.  The flavor is incomprehensible if you've never eaten it.  It's a euphoric moment.  It renders one unable to eat grocery store "strawberries" anymore.  
     
  5. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree.  We live in the suburbs here but we have woods all over.  We get wild raspberries and blackberries.  The flavor burst is just intense.  Don't even get me started on tomatoes, those big huge ones that are all water.
     
  6. french fries

    french fries

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    You're probably talking about "Fraises des bois". Those don't exist here in the U.S. as far as I know. They're just... unbelievably flavored and nothing like a "regular" strawberry. 

     
  7. zagut

    zagut

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    Super Size me!

    Big sells. Small tastes.
     
  8. lagom

    lagom

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    In Sweden they are called "smultron". Intense little berries, fantastic and definatly different than a strawberry( jordgubbar) we pick liters of them every june in the woods and have a few that grow in our garden.
     
  9. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    It's silly to ask a question where the answer is so blatant.  We live in the land of the Big Gulp after all.  We are taught that bigger is better and expect to get a big serving at restaurants.  Once I went out to dinner with a friend who was visiting from Europe and she ordered a coca cola at the restaurant.  They brought her a large, normal glass of coke and she looked at the waiter and said "is this for drinking or bathing in?"
     
  10. genemachine

    genemachine

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    Yes, yes, yes! These grow like weeds in my parents' garden. One of my great childhood memories is to graze on them when they were ripe. Beautiful stuff!
     
  11. french fries

    french fries

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    How lucky!! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif  
     
  12. genemachine

    genemachine

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    We call them "Walderdbeeren" - forest strawberries. Which should mean the same as fraises de bois, if my rusty french serves me right. In the northern, shadowy part of my parents' garden, there is a thicket of raspberries and brambles, covered on the ground level with said strawberries. Ah, just sitting there on a warm day with a book, plucking berries left and right all afternoon....

    Lucky indeed - so many people never get that experience these days.