Fondest Childhood Food Memory

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by chefboyarg, Mar 2, 2010.

  1. chefboyarg

    chefboyarg

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    Hey all. Thought this would be an interesting topic to discuss.

    Mine would have to be the weekends we spent at our little cottage in very rural New Bruncwick, Canada. Our cross-pasture nighbors were my great aunt and great uncle, who were small scale farmers and across the road was my great grandmother. Must be something in the water out there that prolongs life. Anyways, it brings a smile to my face to recall the days we spent at the farm harvesting big, bumpy cucumbers from their plants, yanking orange carrots from the ground, along with potatoes an radishes, taking a handful of peas in their pods and occassionally snacking on the peas, pod and all. Corn was also to be had. My brothers and I loved to husk them, throwing the stringy inner bits and the outer husks all over the front yard of the cottage. I think we just liked making messes to be truthful. While we were over at the farm it was pretty much a given we were going to feed the cows. My grandmother would then proceed to whip up an amazing dinner.

    For dessert we would usually have pie, which was filled with blueberries that grew wild right behind my great grandmother's house at the bottom of a mountain. While over there were required to pick raspberries and strawberries that grew in front of her house right beside a bubbling brook that we were warned never to cross as the current would sweep us away. These were destined to become homemade jams.

    I still e-mail my grandmother (who is surprisingly tech-saavy) to get recipes from her.
     
  2. just jim

    just jim

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    Watching my mom make chicken noodle soup, noodles from scratch.
    It didn't get more scratch than this, we raised our own chickens.
    She also used to make a roast beef hash breakfast.
    She would brown the hash, flip it, then when the second side was nearly done she would make indents with a spoon and crack eggs in the indents and let them poach.
    Then she'd put a dash of worcestershire and cover each egg with cheese and put a lid on until melted.
    Yum.
     
  3. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Watching my Grandmother make Cretan cheese pies.  The dough was just simple flour and water.  The filling is called mizithra and I think that's sort of like ricotta cheese.  She would take a tennis sized ball of dough and press into it a tbsp of cheese and work it into a cheese filled ball.  Then she takes a rolling pin and rolls it out into a 6in round disc.  These would go into a shallow frying pan with olive oil.  She would fry them one by one and each was eaten as it came out of the pan either plain or drizzled with honey, walnuts, molasses, cinammon, or any of the above.  Boy am I in the mood to see my Grandma!
     
  4. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Koukouvagia,  I thought myzithra was like an unsalted feta, rather than like ricotta. At least that's what it seemed like to me; more curd-like, whereas ricotta would be creamy.

    The World Cheese Book describes it thus: "Made for thousands of years from whey of Feta and Kefalotyri, Myzithra is considered the ancester of all Greek whey cheeses. It comes in two types: fresh Myzithra is unsalted or slightly salty and similar to cottage cheese, while aged is dry, salty, and firm." Oddly enough, it has no DOC or PDO protection.

    From this I would have to say I've only sampled the fresh version; which certainly would work in those cheese pies---which sound delish! 
     
  5. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    One of my favourite memories is when my father started experimented with Oriental cooking.  The first dish was chicken with cashews on rice.  He did a great job.  He's always experimented with different styles of cooking (he's actually a Doctor of Physics lecturer - go figure).  Has made pizzas from scratch including the base - but made them too well, so we were still wanting more hehe.  This was his Italian phase and we got lots - really lots - of spaghetti bolognese & terrific lasagnes.  Then there was a baked cheesecake phase.... I think we all gained 10# then :)

    Now my parents are older there are a few dietary restrictions, but he makes a really good mixed steamed veg mix with a white sauce and poaches chicken and fish to perfection.

    When we were very young, back in the dark ages,  apple sauce with dumplings starred in winter.  Mum's sauerkraut with debrecini sausages is a standout memory.  Always a favourite family gathering food - she had to make a tonne of it.  Big family.
     
  6. gummy-bear

    gummy-bear

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    My grandma always greeted me with a bowl of chocolate covered raisins when I would go visit her.

    I remember and love all of her cooking, but that bowl of raisins always stuck with me. Anytime I get nostalgic, that's what I go for.
     
  7. jock

    jock

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    My mother's vegetable soup. We lived in a small town on the east coast of Scotland and surrounded by farm land. All the veggies were local, fresh and (in today's parlance) organic.

    With only a few ingredients - basically carrots, onion, maybe some turnips and potattoes, a little barley to give it body and plain old tap water - she produced the most delicious soup ever.

    She read in a magazine article one day that canned soup, because of how it is produced, is healthier than home made so, no more veggie soup. I haven't stopped looking for the author of that article!!!
     
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  8. web monkey

    web monkey

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    Mine was cheeseburgers at Favalo Brother's Meat Market on North Salina St. in Syracuse, NY.

    Although I didn't appreciate it at the time, they made the most amazing, hot juicy cheeseburgers in the world. They ground their own beef, fresh, right in the store,  cooked it on an old cast flat-top and immediately served it all hot and juicy on plain white bread with a slice of white cheddar. The bread would soak up all the grease, and it was heaven in a little wax paper bag.

    The place had old wooden floors that probably got swept now and then, but hadn't seen varnish in a hundred years, and all they sold was meat, bread, and a few other basics.The whole outside of the building was white stucco and windows containing faded signs that hadn't been changed in decades. Unfortunately, they've been gone for 40 years and now it's just a parking lot. I have no idea what happened to the Favalo Brothers, but  wherever you they are, I just want to say "Great burgers, guys!"

    Terry
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2010
  9. leeniek

    leeniek

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    Meat pies from the Scottish pie man on Concession street.  He made his own pies on site and they were amazing.  I've had Scottish pies since then but none compare to his.
     
  10. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    You're right, it's not like ricotta but I imagine ricotta can be used in its place.  I've never been keen on cooking with these types of cheeses until lately but I do remember helping my grandmother stuff the dough balls with cheese and you're right, its texture is similar to cottage cheese and its flavor is similar to a very mild feta.  The unslated version of the cheese is used for desserts, but in the case of the the cheese pies we use the saltier version. 
     
  11. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    My mom was Slovak, and made Easter morning breakfast buffet old Chez style. Good sliced Kielbasa, Sedic ( Molded scrambled egg hung in cheese cloth), poppy seed and nut cakes, home made breads,Bobka, Baked Ham,on, and on, and on, and on,.......Those were the days you can smell the coffee when you walked into the house....................Chef Bill
     
  12. charron

    charron

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    My grandma's donuts.  She would fry up the 'holes' first, so that if we watched quietly and behaved we could snack on the holes while she finished the batch for the adults.  They were crispy deliciousness.  I now have her donut cutter, but I've never been able to make donuts that even begin to compare.
     
  13. siduri

    siduri

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    Tordelli made from my grandmother's recipe - with a meat, onion, spinach, cheese filling.  These were made every christmas and easter - left to dry on the huge diningroom table on a tablecloth - the whole table top was covered with rows of  these ravioli. 

    My father's cornbread.

    The pancakes we kids made sunday night for supper. 

    A sandwich with toasted pita bread, meat loaf, sharp parmigiano-like cheese and those green long picked peppers they called peperoncini. 

    My father's home made, hand cranked ice cream. 
     
  14. skatz85

    skatz85

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    mine would have to be the time my family would gather on friday night and cook. especially in the summer time when we would cook the food on an open fire along with fresh bread, kebabs, and bunch of salads made from fresh produce my grandma grew. All my family would gather and have fun and enjoy great food.
     
  15. french fries

    french fries

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    That sounds like an incredible experience! Did you guys have an open fire in your backyard? In a fire ring? 
     
  16. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    My fondest memory is watching my then-elderly grandmother mix and knead dough for challah. I have her bread-making board and rolling pin in my kitchen.

    I stood next to my mom during dinner preparations all through my childhood, amazed that, although she never used a cutting board, she could dice an onion perfectly while cradling it in her hand.
     
  17. skatz85

    skatz85

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    im originally from uzbekistan and alot of the food was made on open fire with wood. We would set up a horshelooking thing with bricks and place a kazan which kind of looks like a wok but made of thicker steel and sometimes cast iron. or set the bricks paralle and cook the kabobs like that. we would cook soups and bunch of other foods outside. We had stoves but on a good day or for a party we would cook outside and get the best flavor from the wood and the fresh air, along with fresh ingredients. when i was younger i was the one always starting the fire and watching my grandfather cook (men only cooked on special occasions)and my grandmother aswell when she was in the kitchen.
     
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  18. b.adams

    b.adams

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    Lots of good stories, I am enjoying reading them all.

    For me when I was a kid I spent a lot of time over my aunt and uncles house playing with my cousin. My uncle had a lot of land and had several large gardens that was his pride and joy and also his garden was us kids place to get free snacks. We would always go for the cherry tomatoes and we knew if we got caught there would be hell to pay but it was worth the risk. I still can hear him yelling out the window Hey!!! get away from those!!! and we would run like the wind into the woods. Good times....

    Brian
     
  19. french fries

    french fries

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    Wow - I was wondering where you grew up. That sounds like such a unique experience. I love wood fire cooking, unfortunately haven't done it for years. Back in France we used to go up in the mountains, find a flat area, gather a few stones and a few pieces of dead wood lying around, and start a big fire. We'd cook sausages by skewering them on smaller twigs, steaks by placing them on the flattest stone around the fire. The flavor was unbelievable. We'd sleep around the fire, and the next day when we'd wake up our clothes had that super strong smell of wood fire that we'd bring home with us. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  20. skatz85

    skatz85

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    ^oh yeah thats the best part all that smokie flavor on your clothes oh man, i get excited just thinking about it.