fondant question

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by sweetnspice, Mar 31, 2011.

  1. sweetnspice

    sweetnspice

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    hi everyone! I am new here and new in making fondant. I am so excited to make this.

    To start of, i live in southeast asia where the weather is either hot or rainy and i was wondering how will that affect in making fondant?

    Do i have to work in an air-conditioned room or room temp is fine?

    What are the things that i have to remember? storage, handling, etc. 

    Do u make the traditional fondant or the other one that is called marshmallow fondant?

    opinions and advice are very much appreciated. Thanks so much in advance! :)
     
  2. pcieluck

    pcieluck

    Messages:
    369
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    I personally have never made it, but I believe when a family member makes it, he's sure to use a cold surface. Same as when I use pastries that I don't want the butter inside to melt.  To answer your heat question.
     
  3. sweetnspice

    sweetnspice

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food

    thanks! the weather is really a big problem, especially when i'm making croissant i had to put it in and out of the chiller >.<

    i hope others could give their 2 cents :p
     
  4. sweetnspice

    sweetnspice

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food

    thanks! the weather is really a big problem, especially when i'm making croissant i had to put it in and out of the chiller >.<

    i hope others could give their 2 cents. :p
     
  5. david reed

    david reed

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Sous Chef
    I live on the gulf coast of the U.S. Where you live is hotter but not by much. Use a shortening that holds up well where you live. Humidity is always a problem when working with sugar, as sugar absorbs moisture from the air. Isomalt makes a sugar used for sugar arts that supposedly holds up better to heat and humidity but I know nothing about it beyond that. Maybe you could use it in fondant, I don't know. I've only seen it cooked and poured into molds. I think you'd better plan on airconditioning. There are pourable fondants that you don't have to work with. You can add more tylose to gumpaste to make it withstand higher humidity.