Fondant Potatoes

882
562
Joined May 28, 2015
I'm not sure how much these feature in American cooking but in the UK, fondant potatoes seem to be a favourite in fine dining restaurants and often feature in Masterchef Professionals (UK). I've had several tries at making them with limited success. I tend to end up with overcooked, almost burnt tops and bottoms.

Does anyone have a foolproof method? And what kind of fat and type of potatoes are best to use?
 
Last edited:
2,865
236
Joined Nov 15, 2012
I've heard 2 very distinct versions of fondant potatoes. One where you brown one side deep in clarified butter (heat control is obviously important here), flip then add chicken stock and thyme (bay leaf and rosemary are also good additions), bring to boils and finish in oven. So you end with the crunchy top and stock-soaked bottoms. Excess butter gets spooned over top, remaining stock can go on plate.

The other you cook slowly in butter, no browning here. Both are delicious

A quick google will suggest oven temp, etc.
 
1,342
867
Joined Mar 1, 2017
rick alan rick alan is spot on.

I make fondant potatoes all the time. Its really easy. The key is to thoroughly rinse the potatoes in cold water and use an oil with a high smoke point. Ideally, clarified butter. Brown one side of the potatoes over medium heat, flip and brown the other side. The keys are moderate heat, time and do not touch them once set in the pan.

For this, I like to use a heavy cast iron skillet because of its heat retention. But, I suppose any heavy gauge pan will work. When the potatoes are browned to your liking on both sides, add broth or stock and finish in a 350'f oven until cooked. Again, I agree with rick alan rick alan , bouquet garni of rosemary, lemon thyme and sage or any other fragrant herb really goes nicely.

Good luck. :)
 
1,841
543
Joined Aug 15, 2003
I've heard 2 very distinct versions of fondant potatoes. One where you brown one side deep in clarified butter (heat control is obviously important here), flip then add chicken stock and thyme (bay leaf and rosemary are also good additions), bring to boils and finish in oven. So you end with the crunchy top and stock-soaked bottoms. Excess butter gets spooned over top, remaining stock can go on plate.

The other you cook slowly in butter, no browning here. Both are delicious

A quick google will suggest oven temp, etc.

That's pretty close to how I make them. I brown in clarified butter, then add stock, thyme, (just like you said) and a bit of whole butter. Salt, pepper, and BTB...then baste the potatoes, then pop in the oven. Baste 3-4 more times as they cook and the liquid reduces/glazes. Mine usually aren't crispy but they are very tender, well seasoned/aromatic, and nicely glazed with the stock and butter.

I tend to cut thick slices of potatoes and punch out with a ring cutter, but you can free form them too.
 
1,841
543
Joined Aug 15, 2003
I should add, I've done similar techniques with turnips, kohlrabi, sweet potatoes and celeriac before. The technique works well for almost any root vegetable.

I've also done a variant where I sous vide the punched out potato or veg, circulate in butter/stock, and then finish by glazing in a pan. This also works very well...vegetables sous vide are quite good.
 
882
562
Joined May 28, 2015
add broth or stock and finish in a 350'f oven until cooked. Again, I agree with rick alan rick alan , bouquet garni of rosemary, lemon thyme and sage or any other fragrant herb really goes nicely.

It seems that most of you are using a combination of clarified butter to start and then stock. I've been using the all butter method which I'm thinking is trickier. I'll definitely have a go at using stock. Thanks!

I've also done a variant where I sous vide the punched out potato or veg, circulate in butter/stock, and then finish by glazing in a pan. This also works very well...vegetables sous vide are quite good.

I have a sous vide so I could try this. Are you simply sealing the potato with nothing added to sous vide it? How long do you 'circulate' in butter/stock?
 
1,841
543
Joined Aug 15, 2003
It seems that most of you are using a combination of clarified butter to start and then stock. I've been using the all butter method which I'm thinking is trickier. I'll definitely have a go at using stock. Thanks!



I have a sous vide so I could try this. Are you simply sealing the potato with nothing added to sous vide it? How long do you 'circulate' in butter/stock?

No I add butter and chicken stock to the bag, as well as thyme, then circulate at 185f until tender. When you squeeze a potato through the bag they should start to fall apart if that makes sense. I hesitate to give you a time because of a number of variables, but I would start checking at about 30 mins and go from there.

You can use the liquid in the bag to glaze the potatoes after as well. This was just an attempt by me to streamline the production aspect of the potato so we didn't have to do them a la minute for service, we can just pull a bag and go from there.
 
658
276
Joined Sep 26, 2017
Funny I just made this a few days ago.

I first pan fried the potatoes in a nonstick skillet with oil. Then I put them in a glass baking dish. Poured over the stock half way up the potatoes. Added in the herbs and seasonings. Top each with a pat of butter. Baked in a 200°C oven until the stock almost completely evaporated; took around 30-40 minutes, I believe. Perfect every time.
 
Top Bottom