FLOUR - Different Brands

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by papa, Mar 5, 2001.

  1. papa

    papa

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    Dear Kokopuffs:

    What are you trying to do with the flour? It was not clear from your question.

    I use the King Arthur "European Style" for my daily bread making. For my daily breakfast I use a different flour of another company to make peanut butter bread or orange cake or even pancakes.

    I am still trying to find a company where I can buy different types of grains and make my own blends. I used to do that when I lived in Europe and my flour grinder works perfectly here but I am missing the ingredients. :rolleyes:
     
  2. momoreg

    momoreg

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    What do you mean by 'inferior'? Not organic? Bleached? Store brand? I think the store brands make good unbleached flour. You may not notice a difference between organic or non; it depends on your palate, but if you can find organic, use it.
     
  3. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Although I've used only King Arthur Flour for breadmaking, what would I notice if an "inferior" flour were used? :confused:

    [ March 05, 2001: Message edited by: kokopuffs ]
     
  4. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Hi to all:

    I know that I asked a loaded question. Judging by the replies, all flours are good. It's just a question of finding the right one for the right application (recipe). Why are organic flours recommended? Are there taste or textural differences? :D

    [ March 06, 2001: Message edited by: kokopuffs ]
     
  5. markdchef

    markdchef

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    Arrowhead Mills offers a wide array of grains and flours: blue corn, yellow corn, amaranth, spelt, rice, brown rice, oat, wheat, unbleached, whole grain, barley, buckwheat, pastry, bread, etc.

    All are excellent quality. Once you try organic you will not go back to conventional.
    Why let all those chemicals get in the way of your recipe?

    Try them you will not be disappointed.
    http://onthemarkpcs.homestead.com
     
  6. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Thanks Markdchef. I am certainly aware of Arrowhead Mills, offered at my local health food store. I had also thought about trying some of the bulk organic flours that the store offers; they're stored in the cold box. I'm sure that they'll perform as well. ;)
     
  7. mudbug

    mudbug

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    kokopuffs,

    Perhaps you might consider milling your own fresh grains, you can't be more "superior" than that!

    For more info, click here. The last two links have info on why it can benefit your recipes. ;)
     
  8. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    To Pugzpw:

    READ THE LABEL. Always read the label for the list of ingredients. KA bread flour has no additives. Pillsbury Bread Flour has two additives: malt powder and Vitamin C, both of which increase yeast activity.

    I taught health science; it included a module on nutrition. Please READ THE LABEL for the list of ingredients, y'all.

    Let me deviate although I don't want to open a can of worms. Read the label on herb containers from health food stores. If they contain ephedra, ma huang or photi, then they contain stimulants. Many purchasers think that they've found a magic vitamin or healthy herb whereas they've only gotten a stimulant. Boy oh boy, were they fooled. ;) :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:

    [ March 08, 2001: Message edited by: kokopuffs ]