Floor Mats

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10
Joined Apr 17, 2001
Has anyone out there done away with floor mats on the line completely? I have worked in kitchens that didn't have them, and it didn't seem like a huge deal.  I am thinking about just getting rid of them at my current location because they are so cumbersome and I feel like they just give people an excuse to spill stuff on the floor.  Everyone here is looking at my like I am crazy for suggesting it though.  What are your thoughts?
 
5,507
946
Joined Oct 10, 2005
Hate em. Pain in the butt to clean and keep clean. Fist fights have been fought about where to put them while sweeping and mopping, and the mats are usually the first excuse not to sweep or mop. Slippery when greasy too.

What the Euros do is use "duck boards", resembles a pallet, maybe an inch off the floor with maybe an inch spacing between the boards. This keeps your feet dry, but the boards can be easily propped up against the wall for sweeping and mopping.

Hope this helps....
 
2,180
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Joined Oct 31, 2012
I would get rid of them. I've worked in kitchens with them and kitchens without and like Foodpump, found them to be a pain and an excuse. 

Oddly enough, on several occasions I've thought they would be nice to have but then we got them and they proved more trouble then they were worth. 

Someday I'd like to try the duckboards. They sound like a much better idea. 

I'd get rid of them for a month and see how everyone feels about bringing them back. In the meantime, you can continually remind everyone that the floor is not a trash can and the broom and dustpan are equal opportunity tools. 
 
4,699
931
Joined Aug 21, 2004
I hate mats with a passion. I didn't have them in my kitchen and have 86'ed them at several other places.

Drops, spills, whatever; are to be cleaned as we go, just like knives, cutting boards, counters. Not at the end of the day, that is just gross. Ain't happening on my watch.

I have also seen twisted ankles from people missing a step at the edge (or due to of misalignment) of mats and duckboards. What possible good use do they serve? Takes a nanosecond to clean as you go.

Whenever I would get the "I didn't have time" excuse, I would say "Here's a watch. Time me... Now how long did that take?"
 
639
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Joined Sep 18, 2010
Duck boards any time over any kind of floor matt

Concrete or tiled  floors are killing my feet .
 
1,483
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Joined Jan 31, 2012
Ive worked in commercial kitchens both mats and bare floor. Youve mentioned some down sides, mainly theyre a lot of work to clean, especially the ones with holes, theyre heavy and dificult to handle. Thus its us guys who usually haul em off the floor to clean.
IMO the holy ones suck. There are solid, non slip mats that are easier to keep clean, nothing "goes down" inside, you just sweep or damp mop the mats in place, when the floor gets too crudded up you move them to mop.
So why have em? Two reasons. One theyre non slip. And if you do fall, you have some cush for whatever hits.
Second, maybe cuz Im up 30 or 40 lbs, but the difference between walking back and forth for 10 hours on rubber mats vs bare tile floor is quite noticeable to me. I feel it in my feet, shins, back and even shoulders.
So to summarize I prefer solid rubber non slip mats.,
 
27
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Joined Jan 15, 2017
I owned 3 places for a touch over 20 years... Old school was the mats with the holes... horrible.... you can never really get them clean. Health dept in Los Angeles now cracked down on cleaning them outside. Must be cleaned in the dishwasher.. have to wash 1/2 at a time since to big.

I went to thiner non slip mat with no holes. I wanted nothing on the line, but my insurance company said.. "bad idea if someone slips. You could be found negligent" so mats were back

For me, its all about the shoes not the mats. I switch between Birkenstocks and wood base clogs. Stopped all ankle, knee and back pain
 
3,233
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Joined May 5, 2010
QUOTE:

Ive worked in commercial kitchens both mats and bare floor. Youve mentioned some down sides, mainly theyre a lot of work to clean, especially the ones with holes, theyre heavy and dificult to handle. Thus its us guys who usually haul em off the floor to clean.
IMO the holy ones suck. There are solid, non slip mats that are easier to keep clean, nothing "goes down" inside, you just sweep or damp mop the mats in place, when the floor gets too crudded up you move them to mop.
So why have em? Two reasons. One theyre non slip. And if you do fall, you have some cush for whatever hits.
Second, maybe cuz Im up 30 or 40 lbs, but the difference between walking back and forth for 10 hours on rubber mats vs bare tile floor is quite noticeable to me. I feel it in my feet, shins, back and even shoulders.
So to summarize I prefer solid rubber non slip


QUOTE:

I owned 3 places for a touch over 20 years... Old school was the mats with the holes... horrible.... you can never really get them clean. Health dept in Los Angeles now cracked down on cleaning them outside. Must be cleaned in the dishwasher.. have to wash 1/2 at a time since to big.

I went to thiner non slip mat with no holes. I wanted nothing on the line, but my insurance company said.. "bad idea if someone slips. You could be found negligent" so mats were back

For me, its all about the shoes not the mats. I switch between Birkenstocks and wood base clogs. Stopped all ankle, knee and back pain

There are upsides and downsides to the mats with holes. In many places I worked, we rolled them up and ran them through the dish washer a couple times at the end of the night.

If during the day something drops on the floor and goes into those holes, we were used to pulling up that section, to clean the mess then lay the mat back down.

Tripping over the mat happens no matter what. 

Not paying attention to your work environment is another issue all together.

You work in a kitchen with sharp knives, equipment everywhere, and danger lurks around the next corner if you're not paying attention.

"Failure Is Not An Option"

QQUOTE: mats.,
 
453
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Joined Nov 11, 2012
I've worked in a great many places with the big perforated ones all over the place. I hate cleaning them every night. It's such a time waster and I feel that putting them in the dish station is just a contamination issue waiting to happen. All the nasty stuff that gets clogged in the holes is going into your dishwashing station at end of night. I find it disgusting. As others stated, it becomes an excuse for cooks to wipe stuff onto the floor and ignore it without sweeping. 
 
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Joined Mar 20, 2017
i only use them in the dish area because it's impossible to keep the floor dry over there but I threw all the ones on the line away the day I took over my current kitchen. Like others have said they're a pain to clean and cause more problems than they're worth
 
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Joined Mar 13, 2017
I don't use them. If i'm running a kitchen where they're used i'll generally put them in storage unless the crew complains about shin, ankle pain which rarely happens.
Too often I've seen chefs trip on the curled edges, they're just filthy, the extra 20 mins the KPs spend setting up the high pressure hose and spraying them down could be better spent...
 
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