Flexible turners

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by phatch, Dec 23, 2009.

  1. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    So I see these large floppy turners/spatulas in the kitchen aisles and specialty stores and I just can't figure out what purpose they're supposed to serve that a stiff turner doesn't do just as well.

    Any one have enlightenment for me?
     
  2. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    If they're the ones I'm thinking of, Phil, they're billed as fish turners.
     
  3. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Phil,

    Do you mean the slotted, "fish turners?"

    If so, three main purposes.

    They're very thin, which can be very helpful especially if you don't know to cook things so they release or how to use a spatula.

    The slots prevent air pockets, so food doesn't stick and slides off. That's hardly ever a problem for me, usually the opposite. That is, lose your focus for even a second and stuff wanders off the spatula.

    Enough cynicism. They actually are gentle, and extra good for delicate, crisp (but not Crips') fish skin and fragile crusts and breadings. Probably a necessity these days in a professional, high-end kitchen -- especially for those who cook fish. Worth fooling around with, but the quality brands get dear. Dexter makes very good ones at a semi-reasonable price. Some are cut with a (usually right) "handed" bias, you want to watch for that if you're buying.

    BDL
     
  4. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, they claim they're for delicate foods. But I don't see it. They droop when you lift and jump when you try to slide it under things. Both recipes for breaking apart a fish.

    Big turners for dealing with fish I can understand. And own.

    Oh, I agree on thin, but I prefer rigid and thin.
     
  5. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    No disagreement. None.

    BDL
     
  6. mikelm

    mikelm

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    You said...

    "...extra good for delicate, crisp (but not Crips')"

    Is that a Southern California "in" joke?

    Mike
     
  7. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    West coast party is the very best party 'cuz a west coast party don't quit.

    BDL
     
  8. just jim

    just jim

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    For Sunday brunch, we "poach" our eggs in the steamer in hotel pans.
    The flexible turner is ideal for picking these eggs up.
     
  9. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    I do it this way and while doing got a brainstorm, I break all my eggs into steamer hard cook them cool them .then use in chopped liver and egg salad. No labor peeling try it.
     
  10. cape chef

    cape chef

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    I never thought of that,great idea!
     
  11. just jim

    just jim

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    Good idea Ed.
    We steam our "hardboiled" eggs,but in shell.

    I've also steamed the "poached" eggs in sprayed muffin tins.
    Works great but looks a little too "manufactured".
    Great for egg muffin sandwiches though.
     
  12. adaml

    adaml

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    I love the thin, stiff fish spatula's. I can't imagine a floppy one being useful at all.