fish yield

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by kingfarvito, Jun 28, 2013.

  1. kingfarvito

    kingfarvito

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    Hey there guys, I just got my first chef job. The first change I'm making is to switch to whole fish. We got our first fish order today with me at the helm. 2 huge grouper. I broke them down and got a yield of 71.5% (50% filet, 21.5% scrap, 28.5% un-useable carcass) I'm wondering how this fairs compared to some of you more expert fish cutters out there. ETA. I felt I should let you guy know this was on a headless gutted fish.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2013
  2. cacioepepe

    cacioepepe

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    After checking the web it looks like you might be in relatively good shape.  Most sites state that one should yield around 45% for skin on fillets, but thats for a head on fish, and as we know snappers have large domes.  My concern is the amount of scrap.  If my math is right, for every fillet you cut, say a 5 oz piece, you're producing 2 oz trim, which is a lot. Granted, if its used in a smart application, maybe its not that big of a deal.  

    I'm interested to hear what ya'll think.
     
  3. kingfarvito

    kingfarvito

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    Maybe I'll be getting boned on  more expensive fish, but I got the grouper at 8.50 a pound and got 27 6oz portions and about 4 pounds of high quality scrap from 22 pounds of grouper. I'm moving the 6oz portions as entrees for right around $25 and the scrap is getting cut into 3oz portions and going into an app spec for $9.50
     
  4. left4bread

    left4bread

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    That 28.5% is for fish stock, no? For reals, make stock with it and freeze.

    Apples and oranges, but I buy whole salmon and expect 20% waste from the monger to fillet it.

    I figure a 10% waste on my guys skinning, removing belly fat, and pin-boning it.

    Hope that helps.
     
  5. duckfat

    duckfat

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    I wanna meet the cook that can yield 80% out of a whole Salmon! 8-10% is a normal loss for skinning alone. The Skeleton weighs a heckuva lot more than the skin. 30% is a reasonable loss even on H&G Salmon.

    50% fillet yield on grouper or snapper is pretty much right on the $$ unless you have a very skilled fish cleaner.

    Dave
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2013
  6. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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  7. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Nice chart  - saved

    Thanks
     
  8. left4bread

    left4bread

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    Nice to meet you too!

    Seriously, though, I couldn't do it. I don't expect my 'cooks' to be able to do it.

    But I expect my fish mongers' minions to be able to do it.
     
  9. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    I am with DuckFat on this one. Generally you lose 25% in just removing the head from a whole salmon. In my experience, whole salmon to fillet is about 35%.
     
  10. chefcomesback

    chefcomesback

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    I have used whole fish always to improve the quality,freshness and uniform cuts . Altough it is cheaper to get H/G whole fish , unless you have a designated person breaking down the fish you will have some inconsistencies. With having a large head grouper is a good example. For example you order 12 pounds of snapper and hope to get 3 each 4pounders. With %50 wastage you will get 12* 8 ounce filets right? But the fish came as   6 each 2 pounders and the person "butchering" got 6,5 oz sides each. What are you going to do? I do not serve the tail ends of in my restaurant. If I had to square the tails off i would be down to 4 oz. Then I would have to give 2 pieces instead of 1. at the end 2 pounds of fish plus labour is used for 1 main meal then. In theory you can have the same problem with ordering filets but unless You are confident about having a set person or good skill level in your kitchen it has more elements it can go wrong.

    P.S : I do all of my meat and wholefish fabrication in my restaurant
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2013