Fish & rigor mortis

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by markv, Jun 17, 2003.

  1. markv

    markv

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    OK Folks I need your opinions.

    My executive chef at the restaurant where I work sometimes gets freshly caught fish from the jersey shore from a group of local fishermen. For example, we had some nice sea bass the other day that were caught the night before.

    My chef does not serve them for at least 24 hours. They have rigor mortis from being recently killed and he feels they need time for the muscles to relax.

    I have never heard of this, (not rigor mortis but waiting a day to serve the fish). Every source I have ever encountered always recommends serving fish as fresh as possible.

    Your thoughts?

    Mark
     
  2. bouland

    bouland

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    Some fish was “aged” for a day in the restaurant I worked in in France. This was mostly fish that was being cooked before serving. Fish that was being served uncooked — mostly local farm-raised salmon trout — was often killed in the afternoon and served for dinner.
     
  3. soussweets

    soussweets

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    if your fish is still in rigor, you should let it rest. for one it is more difficult to cut a fish that looks like a half moon. but the main problem with riggor is ease of cooking, if you cook a fish with riggor it will curl up in your pan and seem rather unapealing, also letting it rest a day helps the last living cells process the toxins out leaving a cleaner taste.
     
  4. markv

    markv

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    So it sounds like the best bet is either eating the fish EXTREMELY fresh, i.e. just caught, or waiting 24 hours.

    Mark
     
  5. chefkell

    chefkell

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    That sounds about right Mark...I won't be caught on a fishing trip without limes, salt, cilantro and jalapenos...you never know:D