FIRST TIME HERE AM LOOKING FOR A MANUAL FOR AN OLD PRESSURE COOKER

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by callmeshag, Oct 20, 2010.

  1. callmeshag

    callmeshag

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    SORRY FOR THE CAPS FIRST OFF, I AM VISUALLY IMPAIRED

    I HAVE BEEN USING MY GRANDMOTHERS OLD MIRRO 394 PRESSURE COOKER SINCE I WAS A TEEN, AND IT MAKES SUCH WONDERFUL MEALS. 

    I HAVE LOST THE MANUAL THAT CAME WITHIT AND WOULD LIKE O REPLACE IT.  I HAD SEEN THERE WAS A SITE TO DOWNLOAD IT FROM FOR FREE, (WHICH I NEED SINCE I AM ON A VERY LIMITED INCOME)

    WHEN I WENT TO THE SITE IT NO LONGER EXISTS, SO, I WAS WONDERING IF ANYONE HAS A SITE I CAN GET IT FROM OR WOULD BE WILLING TO SHARE A COPY OF THE FILE THEYHAVE?  AGAIN IT IS THE   MIRRO MATIC 394 M 4 QT, COKKER THANK YOU SO MUCH AND LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS NEW COMMUNITY
     
  2. tylerm713

    tylerm713

    Messages:
    477
    Likes Received:
    35
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    This seems to be a fairly common problem. Unfortunately all I could find were places where you can purchase the manual for about $5.
     
  3. petemccracken

    petemccracken

    Messages:
    3,401
    Likes Received:
    159
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
  4. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,543
    Likes Received:
    508
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    Mirro is still in business as part of the Wearever group. They should have past manuals available.  www.mirro.com
     
  5. gonefishin

    gonefishin

    Messages:
    1,466
    Likes Received:
    28
    Exp:
    At home cook
       Like others, I looked around too trying to find a manual for you.  But no luck...sorry.  If you find a place online that has it available free for download, can you please update this thread?  That way if anyone references this thread missing their manual they'll have a place to go for one.

     good luck,

       dan
     
  6. petemccracken

    petemccracken

    Messages:
    3,401
    Likes Received:
    159
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    OK, so I didn't "make myself clear:Go to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PressureCookerRecipes/files/_Pressure Cooker Manuals/ (you probably will have to "join the group") and you will find, in the files, the following:Mirro PressCookerManual2005.pdf Mirror Pressure Cooker 2005 manual with recipes 2595 KB khead123abcOffline Jan 21, 2007Mirro%20Pressure%20Cooker%20Manual.pdf Mirro Pressure Cooker Manual with recipes (older version) 1893 KB khead123abcOffline Jan 21, 2007Now, there are a variety of manuals as well, Fagor, Cooking Essentils, etc.
     
  7. amazingrace

    amazingrace

    Messages:
    929
    Likes Received:
    18
    Exp:
    At home cook
    CALLMESHAG:   Your vintage Mirro is the type pressure cooker with the weighted regulator, commonly referred to now as a "jiggler'.  The directions for these older appliances are fairly universal,  with the only possible variance being the ppsi [pounds per square inch].   I believe the MIRRO cookers are 15ppsi.  The instructions would be straighforward.  With this in mind,  any manual for a similar cooker will suffice for the basics. 

     

    However,  I would advise you to be sure your gasket and other parts are in good working order,  and that the pan and lid are both sound.  MIRRO cookers are cast aluminum.  Older ones are prone to stress cracks, especially ones that have been dropped.  Make sure the lid and pan line up properly and that the rims of both are true to round.  If the gasket is dried out or cracked, it should be replaced,  and that might be problematic for this older model.  Gaskets are designed to be used only with the model for which they are made,  so substituting is not recommended.

     

    Before resurrecting this cooker for practical use,  do a test drive, to make sure it comes up to pressure and performs as it should in every respect.  Test drives are done using water only,  no food.   You can find out more about this at www.missvickie.com

    A cautionary note:  Older pressure cookers such as this one lack the integrated safety features that are now standard on newer models.  Especially important are the pressure lock which prevents the cooker from being opened before all pressure has been released,  and the over-pressure release that safely vents excess pressure without calamity.  You might consider getting a new cooker just for this reason alone.  I realize you have financial restraints,  but in this case we are looking at safety as well as value.  There are economically priced cookers on the market.  Even some of the stainless ones are reasonably priced. 
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2010
  8. callmeshag

    callmeshag

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Thank you so much for all your information, i have been cooking with this pressure cooker weekly sometimes more since i was a tenn,i am now 49. Every 5 years i replace the fuse, and the gasket, the gasket more so if it becomes broken down, i have considered buying a more modern one as well. thank you again     rosemarie
     
  9. ted anibal

    ted anibal

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    I have located a usable manual for Mirro pressure cookers. It is a PDF file with a date of "June '04" hand written on the Table of Contents page. I can send it by e-mail to anyone who may be interested. I was looking for any Mirro manual because my wife inherited two older pressure cookers -- a Mirro-matic "6" and a Presto 4-quart, and neither had manuals. I studied the manual and "test drove" the Mirro to make sure it worked. Now, we just made some terrific beef stock and the old Mirro-matic M-396 worked flawlessly. I am now attempting to find out what year it was manufactured (no luck so far). In addition, I have ordered replacement parts for both cookers. The Presto was missing its pressure regulator and overpressure plug.

    So, after 37 years of marriage, we're looking forward to discovering many more recipes to try with our "heirloom" pressure cookers!
     
  10. roger cary

    roger cary

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Baker
    Mirro-Matic #394M Manual available here
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 18, 2012
  11. roger cary

    roger cary

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Baker
    Professional Baker or Master Baker..../img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
     
     
  12. jeffbo1

    jeffbo1

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Here is a link which shows a pdf of the same 1946 manual I use for my Mirro 394M....it has very good recipes within....
     
  13. jeffbo1

    jeffbo1

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    At home cook
    eastshores likes this.
  14. eastshores

    eastshores

    Messages:
    1,453
    Likes Received:
    300
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    Ordinarily I'd think resurrecting old threads was just re-hashing old information.. but you Jeffbo1.. you've changed this game. Thank you for finding the original manual and posting it here. You've done a great service to many.
     
  15. indago

    indago

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    At home cook
    I acquired a 394M Mirro Matic pressure cooker and found the "jiggler" to be unreliable, so I removed it and put a pressure gauge on it that reads to 20 pounds.  I usually cook to 5 to 10 pounds pressure.  This old cooker works really well, and I have to watch it.  It doesn't have any safety devices.  I put a pressure release screw in the gauge fitting, using it to fill the cooker with steam before cooking, and then using it to release the pressure when finished.

    I have been using it this way for a couple of years now with no problems.  Of course, it is something you don't walk away from and hope everything works out OK.  I have the time, though, and realize that the modern young folks have a fast moving lifestyle that doesn't allow waiting.

    I use it for cooking potatoes, carrots (especially large carrots), rice, corned beef.  I cook the rice in a small 1 quart stainless steel bowl, with some water in the cooker to create steam, and half cup of organically grown long grain brown rice with two cups of water in the stainless steel bowl.  I cook the rice at around 5 pounds pressure for about an hour.  Delicious with some cut chicken breasts, cut sugar snap peas, and some chopped onions stir fried all together in a fry pan.
     
  16. lucky001

    lucky001

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Does anyone have manual for Sabatier 6-quart Stainless Pressure Cooker model 5036011.  I need a copy
     
  17. tumbleweed

    tumbleweed

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Did you ever find the book?

    If not, I believe I have the one you want.

    You can have it for free, I'll send you a

    photo if you want.
     
  18. jimyra

    jimyra

    Messages:
    918
    Likes Received:
    190
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    That's crazy.  I have been using pressure cookers for many years and will not use some older ones I have without emergency pressure relief.  What you describe is setting a bomb on your stove and waiting for the explosion.  This could seriously injure anyone nearby.  You can find pressure cookers at estate sales for just a few dollars, replace the seal and safety valve, and have a safe cheap pressure cooker.  Ten psi steam can cook the flesh right off you bones.  Please play safe.  Jimyra    
     
  19. indago

    indago

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    At home cook
    It is no different than the old railroad engineer who sat right behind a huge pressure boiler watching the steam gauge of a steam locomotive as he progressed down the rails.  The boiler won't explode if you tend to it properly.  Certainly, you can't walk off and leave it unattended.  If you have such a fear of your pressure cooker, then, for sure, don't use one without all the safety devices.  When I'm cooking, I'm cooking.  I'm not talking on the phone; texting; or other such distractions.  I really enjoy using the pressure cooker as it is extremely reliable with the gauge.  I use it several times a week.  The main reason I removed the jiggler and put on a pressure gauge is I don't have to level the stove for the jiggler to work properly.  The cooker can set at an angle and it still works reliably.  I have a 2 1/2 quart Mirro — bought in the 1960's — that I have reworked with a pressure gauge also, and it is a joy to work with.  I always use 5 pounds pressure, and adjust the times accordingly.

    You just can't beat a "baked" potato, or a huge carrot, or squash, or beets, done in a pressure cooker, or the rice that I have previously mentioned.  The flavors are retained in the food.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2016
  20. jimyra

    jimyra

    Messages:
    918
    Likes Received:
    190
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Indago

    "It is no different than the old railroad engineer who sat right behind a huge pressure boiler watching the steam gauge of a steam locomotive as he progressed down the rails."

    Was the engineers name Casey Jones?  I have several cookers including one I bought in the 60's.  I said crazy yesterday I'll say naive and not you stupid but a stupid thing to do.  Good Luck.