First frost

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kuan, Oct 8, 2002.

  1. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Well, we had our first frost two nights ago. Sucks :(

    Kuan
     
  2. katbalou

    katbalou

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    dear kuan,
    never mind the first frost. we are now getting the first snow.:cry:
    this is way too early for me. this really sucks. it's only oct. 23. i guess this means we're in for a really nasty winter. this crap started about 2 hrs. ago - 7A.M. and i still see flurries and the ground is covered. ughh.
    kat
     
  3. panini

    panini

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    Yea, the winter jackets are out here. We have just dipped below the 70 deg. mark at night. :D
     
  4. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    I hate you Panini! :)

    Kuan
     
  5. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I just returned to Denver from the Southern California desert. Cold weather sucks, especially when it snows. They can have it for all I care.
     
  6. w.debord

    w.debord

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    Send it my way! I'll strap some boards on my feet and away I go................................................ .................................................. ...............
     
  7. catciao

    catciao

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    Speaking of snow, it'll all be gone tomorrow. I was making some soup the other day and needed some fresh thyme but my herb garden was covered with a foot of snow. I reached my hand down through the snow where I had planted it and pulled some sprigs out. It was still perfect. Now that the snow is all but melted I can see that my hearty herbs like rosemary and thyme survived but the more leafy delicate herbs are black and dead. So here's my question since I'm sure I haven't seen the last of freezing rain and snow: do I leave these herbs in the ground or pull them, dry them and store them?
     
  8. marmalady

    marmalady

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    Catcaio,

    I'm assuming you mean your hardy herbs? If you can protect them from the heavy, heavy frosts they may make it through the winters - especially since our winters have been so nutty lately. I usually just pile leaves on top of the whole plants, to insulate them some from the wind and freeze/thaw cycles. Have had good luck with rosemary, oregano, chives, thyme, and even parsley this way!
     
  9. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Although I haven't a green thumb, it seems that rosemary stands up to a lot of abuse. I mean, it grows wild on the cliffs overlooking the ocean in N. California and survives despite the harsh weather conditions - save snow - up there.