Fillo/phyllo dough

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by foodnfoto, Feb 14, 2001.

  1. foodnfoto

    foodnfoto

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    I am having a difficult time with fillo dough and was hoping that some of you could help me out. I thaw the package, unopened in the fridge overnight, then temper on the counter top for 2 hours before trying to use it. My problem? Every different brand I have used still tears and sticks together when I try to seperate the leaves leaving me with only messy kataifi, not nice fillo leaves. I have tried Athens, Apollo, and Fillo Factory (highly recommended by every food pro I know) -still, shreds only. Any insight or suggestions?
     
  2. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Foodnfoto,

    Believe me,you are not alone in your quest for the perfect Phyllo. I'm good for one torn sheet out of every 5 or 6. The method you use to defrost and temper is the right way. The only thing that could be part of the problem is if in transit the dough has a chance to start defrosting, then putting it back in the freezer and dfrosting agian could cause a problem. I feel as diffacult as it is sometimes to work with phyllo it is quite forgiving with the finished product.
    I wish I could be more specific,but it sounds to me that your procedure is in line. I assume you keep the dough covered with a cloth when your not using it.
    cc
     
  3. momoreg

    momoreg

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    For whatever it's worth, if you haven't tried Fantis, I think it's much better than Apollo, but I've never tried the other 2 brands you mentioned.
     
  4. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I never buy phyllo at the stores any more. I grab some from the restaurant. You may want to also. Must stores don't have a clue about how delicate phyllo really is. They don't care how many times it thaws and refreezes. If you have any small family run stores in your area check them out as they are more likely to take care of their products.
     
  5. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    Recently I found Pepperidge Farm brand in my grocery store. I was impressed with the quality, and the sheets were larger than the other brands mentioned (all of which I have used). It's really a crapshoot, though. Cape chef is right about how the wholesaler/retailers handle it is quite important. Wish I had a source for fresh phyllo!
     
  6. lynne

    lynne

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    I'm excited because we have a local Italian deli/specialty shop. They also carry some select Greek products, good tarama. But even more exciting-fillo! In good condition!

    When I worked at a Greek restaurant, we always checked the fillo at time of arrival -- check to make sure boxes are in good condition (if they've bben allowed to sit and thaw, the boxes tend to get a little mooshed.

    By the way, when we needed fillo quickly, we were told to thaw it in the microwave on high for 30 seconds at a time -- (works best on partially thawed dough-still in sealed plastic package).

    [ 02-15-2001: Message edited by: lynne ]
     
  7. lynne

    lynne

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    Speaking (not really) of sorta Greek - Foodnfoto, do you remember those late night greek grilled cheeses from Hectors?
     
  8. foodnfoto

    foodnfoto

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    Oh, my God!! I can't beleive someone else here knows of those sandwiches!
    They were great to sober up with. Maybe what made them so good was the fact that the only time I ate was when I was half-baked myself!! I cried the day Hector's burned down. I ate a burger and fries there the first day they opened in 1968 (their sign read-Hector's Famous since 1968.)
     
  9. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    So don't hold out: tell us about those Greek grilled cheese sandwiches!
     
  10. foodnfoto

    foodnfoto

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    They were really nothing special. I'm sure if I went there without being quite lit, I would have gagged. They look a piece of greek pita, spread it with margarine and olive oil, threw on a few slices of underipe tomato, white american cheese and cooked it on a flat-top griddle until melty.
    Then you folded it in half (taco-style) to eat it. Greasy spoon food but a Chapel Hill tradition and one of only2 places in town that would feed you late night food. You might not want to hear about Time-Out---but you could get a wicked bacon, egg and cheese biscuit at 2:30 am and not need (or want) to eat for another 3 days.
     
  11. m brown

    m brown

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    I have been having the best time with phyllo lately because WE BOUGHT A CASE WORTH!!!
    Makes all the difference. I don't always bother with the thawing methods, just take it out of the freezer and put into the reach-in for a day or so and use right out of the cooler as needed. I just wish it had more body for holding the shape without having to form between foil.
    :rolleyes:
     
  12. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    There are two thicknesses if phyllo dough, one is for sheet pans and the other is for individual pastries. I just found bureka dough and am interested in seeing how that works....
    We have an incredible hole in the wall store Athenian Imports on Big Bend and Clayton that has fresh phyllo shipped in, there is a huge difference in quality, I've never had a bad crumbly batch they've all been soft and supple. Guess they buy directly from the company.
    I went to a conference in Chapel Hill several years ago and thought it had a wonderful assortment of interesting restaurants....especially near the college.
    I was impressed with the volume of good restaurants for such a small town.
     
  13. lynne

    lynne

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    foodnfoto-

    You had to bring up Timeout? I went for the chicken-n-cheese biscuits myself! And yes, the one time I went there without a few first, it was disgusting!!!

    Re:the grilled cheeses - I remember them with American, a sprinkling of feta and a ton of tzadziki...and yes, the underripened tomatoes...

    I remember very vividly the day Hectors was on fire -- we were sitting on the church steps next to School Kids Records as the fire engines came up. Wow-I miss Franklin Street! Even lasagna at the Rat!

    Maybe I can head that way for the DUKE GAME!!

    [ 02-18-2001: Message edited by: lynne ]
     
  14. anneke

    anneke

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    I was at the Food and Wine Show in my town this weekend and ran accross a company specialising in phyllo dough. THeirs was almost like a large round crepe, ultra thin but quite strong. It doesn't tear as easily and withstands a bit of bad treatment much better than regular phyllo. It also tastes much better. I'll have to see if I picked up any info from them; if so I will post the source. If not, I'm sure they'll be available soon...
     
  15. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Are you referring to brick dough?
     
  16. anneke

    anneke

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    Hmmm...
    I don't recall it being called that.
     
  17. momoreg

    momoreg

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    I got mine from patisfrance, I believe. It is called feuille de brik in French, but we call it brick dough. It's just like you describe, like a crepe, but you brush it with butter and bake, like phyllo. It comes out a little bit sturdier, and crunchy. It's very versatile.
     
  18. cape chef

    cape chef

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    john Degnan who is the ex pastry chef at the lodge at koele lana's in Hawaii uses feulle de brick to garnish his asian rice tart.
    He cuts them into triangle brushes them with butter and some raw suger and bakes them.
    pretty cool stuff
    cc
     
  19. momoreg

    momoreg

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    I used to work with John at Rainbow. I didn't know he was in Hawaii. Do you know him, cape?
     
  20. mudbug

    mudbug

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    There was an excellent segment on homemade phyllo today on Martha Stewart Living. It's so pliable you can crush a sheet into a ball (as you would crumple up and throw away a piece of paper), open it back up and use it. "Like silk" they said, as if working with a piece of fabric it's so resilient. I'm seriously going to have to consider making a batch for myself!

    For more info click here.

    :)

    [ February 27, 2001: Message edited by: cchiu ]