Filling!

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by tambopata, Apr 10, 2002.

  1. tambopata

    tambopata

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    Hi everybody!

    I would like to know if someone could give me the English definition of filling, in pastry!
    Thank you very much!
    Helen
     
  2. w.debord

    w.debord

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    The Oxford dictionary says "material that fills a cavity".
     
  3. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    W. DeBord's defination is about as specific as you can get unless you have a specific product in mind. There are many different fillings (pastry cream, whipped cream, choc. mousse, fruit mousse, jam, jelly, marmalade, etc.). The list is almost endless. As are the things to fill (eclairs, profiteroles, cakes, doughnuts,etc.)

    In French, I believe the proper term, at least for savory fillings would be a "farce". Though I am not absolutely sure of this. Anyone else back me on this? I am not sure the same word would be used to describe a sweet filling. But at least it might give you a start on where to find a translation.
     
  4. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Farce is translated into "stuffing" which is similar to the word "filling" in the context you are using it, though I am not sure that the translation would be exactly correct for your needs.
     
  5. tambopata

    tambopata

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    Hi Pete and thanks!
    I have just seen your answer on the forum (I answered to your private message!)
    What I am searching for actually is not a translation, I have it, fourrage in French is filling in English. It seems to be sure. I would need a definition of the word filling in English!
    hope you can help me,
    Helene
     
  6. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Then W. DeBord's definition is about the best you can do, for an overall defination, without getting to specific.