Feedback requested on three grilling techniques

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by wtdedula, Jun 16, 2012.

  1. wtdedula

    wtdedula

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    Hi All;

    I have been interested in learning the best grilling techniques in order to turn out grilled chicken breast like I find at some of the restaurants I frequent like Applebees. I tend to be drawn to grilling magazines many times i go to the grocery store and I have a ton at home now. Now with the grilling season upon us, I am again thinkming about doing more experimenting. I would like to ask this forum about three specific grilling techniques and get your feedback on them.

    1. First, in most of my grilling cookbooks, grilled chicken (or rib) recipes seem to use either a rub or a marinade - most use a marinade, actually. Anyone know what technique most restaurants use - would them tend to use marinade chicken pieces overnight, or use a rub ? Also, would it be feasible to use both a marinade and a rub - A few of my grilling recipes use a marinade but also rub salt and pepper over the chicken just before grilling would could also be a rub.

    2. How effective is it to use the broiler (of a stove) instead of a grill to cook chicken breast or pieces (After Marinating and rubbing)?

    3. Finally, one of the problems I have frequently is that my chicken comes out dry at the end of the grilling because I am sure to grill to the proper safe temperature and I never grill with the skin on. A few of my recipes use a short cut method of cooking chicken until very tender in the oven and then finish off on the grill for a very short time? Do any of you do this and how effective is it if you do ?

    Thanks for your feedback.

    Tim
     
  2. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Chicken often benefits from a brine rather than a marinade.  Bone in, skin on chicken breasts will grill up more flavorful and juicy than boneless, skinless ones.  What do you consider as a "safe" temperature for the chicken?  Overcooking to something like 180 F will give you dry chicken.

    mjb.
     
  3. chefzone

    chefzone

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    I cook my chicken to 160 then cover with foil, and let rest for 15 minutes before eating it, this usually get's the pink out.

    Ken
     
  4. chefzone

    chefzone

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    In grilling chicken, it's best to put the grill marks on, then put them in the oven to finish.  Never partly cook your chicken and cool it off and finish it off on the grill.
     
  5. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    The marinade is key.  It needs to be briny and it needs to sit for more than 30 minutes.  I'd say at least a couple hours.  Your grill should have a hot spot and a not so hot spot.  Transfer to the not so hot spot before they get burned.  
     
  6. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I think Applebees chicken breasts are seasoned and frozen and then shipped to its restaurants.  Can't say for sure what they do though.

    For excellent guidance on how to grill run to Amazon and buy a book by Steve Raichlen.  He makes grilling super simple and effective and is our go to when we grill.  My husband, who knows nothing about cooking has become an expert grill master over the past couple of years and considers the Raichlen books the bible to grilling.  There are also several videos on youtube.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2012
  7. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    • Trim the tenders off, they cook much cooker than the rest of the breast.   Reserve them for another purpose.  If you have kids, they make excellent "nuggets."  If you don't, saute them quickly, deglaze the pan with a little white wine, and make a lemon-butter sauce.  Or... well you get the idea. 
    • Brine chicken breasts.  Salty, seasoned buttermilk is an excellent brine.  Overnight is a very long time to brine something as small as a breast.  If you're going to hold breasts overnight in a brine or marinade, keep it fairly "weak," as to salt.  As a general rule, you should harmonize the size of the piece, and the strength and length of the brine to one another. 
    • If you marinate or brine, make sure to wipe your breasts clean before going to the grill.
    • Use a dry or a wet rub if you like.  You can certainly rub over a brine or marinade.  There are no rules, other than remember to keep track of the seasonings -- ESPECIALLY SALT -- and adjust the rub accordingly.
    • The grill should be clean, hot and lubricated.  If that sounds pornographic -- good!  It will be easy to remember.   CLEAN, HOT and LUBRICATED.
    • If you didn't use a rub, the meat should be lubricated with oil as well.
    • In order to retain moisture and a tender texture, chicken breasts should usually be cooked with very high heat, and as quickly as possible.
    • If you're cooking skin on, cook the skin side first.  Don't try to pry the chicken off the grill with your spatula, or the skin will stick and you'll lose it.  WAIT until the skin has cooked to is "release point."  When you can tap it on the side and it moves along the grill, it's ready to turn.
    • You can broil chicken indoors and get very good results.  Follow the same rules, and the results will be good -- but NOT the same.
    BDL
     
  8. wtdedula

    wtdedula

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    Hes I know that Brine is supposed to allow chicken to retain moisture. My hesitation to using brine is that it increases the sodium content of the chicken. Wish there was somethng else to use other than salt. I believe 165 is the recommended safe temperature.

    Tim
     
  9. wtdedula

    wtdedula

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    I don't think that's what the recipes I saw required - ie. half cooking and then grilling. I think they required the chicken to be fully cooked in the oven until tender and then finished up on the grill to place grill marks and maybe apply a sauce.

    Tim
     
  10. wtdedula

    wtdedula

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  11. Iceman

    Iceman

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    I got this from a TV show (I have tweaked it a little bit). It works really nice. 

    I start w/ skin-on bone-less breasts and thighs. I keep them frozen, but just defrosted enough to be soft on the outside to hold the rub. I wipe them down w/ a mix of liquid smoke and a little oil. Then I rub them down well. They go in a high-sided hotel-style pan on a rack. Into the oven for 4-5 hours @ 250* until nice and GBD crusty. They come out and rest for 8-10 minutes, then get sliced up. I add some of the rub to the au jus in the pan. Mix it up and put the sliced meat into it.   

    The guy on TV makes it w/ a whole Tom turkey breast. He doesn't use liquid smoke, but cooks it in a smoker for 10-12 hours. I do it in the oven w/ no real smoke, and cut the time because I use parts instead of one(1) big breast. I don't know, but mine looks and tastes great in a much smaller portion than his.