Favorite Wine Term

Discussion in 'Pairing Food and Wine' started by cape chef, Jan 6, 2001.

  1. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Hey, There are some pretty funny wine terms out there,Unctuous,brambly,briary,Brick,Etc.
    They all have a particular meaning and are recognized in the wine world as basic language.
    Just curious, What are some of your favorite terms? Dick,David?
    cc
     
  2. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    I'm not Dick or David but my favorite was the one that was like a stable, or leathery...what is that????? Chewy wine....
    There are funky terms you don't hear associated with food. I've noticed most serious wine guys don't like to talk characteristics while they drink....
     
  3. greg

    greg

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    Assertive! I'm not a wine drinker, but if I was, I'd want an "assertive" wine. Yep, wine with an attitude, wine that will get mean if you refuse the bottle because it's corked. It's the wine terms based on human characteristics that I find amusing.
     
  4. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Shroomgirl, leathery,Tobacco,barnyard.these are terms associated with many wines of Graves, Chewy refers to a wine that has a lot of tannins,young and full bodied PS I know you are not Dick or David.
    Greg assertive is a term used for a wine with a forward (up front)flavor and nose. Again assertive wines are young,when different components are vying for your attention
    cc
     
  5. isa

    isa

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    My favourite wine term? More please. [​IMG]
     
  6. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Sisi...That is by far the best Wine term
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    cc
     
  7. katherine

    katherine

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    I like a red wine with "blackberry" flavors. I used to make a blackberry wine, but its lots easier to buy a red wine that's naturally like this.
     
  8. momoreg

    momoreg

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    A fiend of mine used to make up funny wine descriptions. May favorites were "sporty" and "jumpy". [​IMG]
     
  9. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Yep barnyard....that's the term I find "amusing"....like who would really want to drink "barnyard"????
    Then the question also becomes was that the intent of the winemaker? Then the WHY question comes out....then the so what foods would you serve with "barnyard">
    thought process of a shroomgirl.

    [This message has been edited by shroomgirl (edited 01-07-2001).]
     
  10. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Beef, or chicken?? Hahah. That's great!! I guess chicken droppings would go well with that. OOOhhh, did I say that?
     
  11. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Momoreg....you typed fiend...???? Freudian slip> sorry couldn't resist.
     
  12. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Yep~ still prefer Margauxs....but won't turn down a Haut Brion. Just having fun.
     
  13. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Yep, definitely a Freudian slip.
     
  14. cape chef

    cape chef

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    If you like "Grapey" wines You might want to try a number of Gamey based wines and wines from southern Burgundy like Beaujolais Village,Brouilly,Fleurie are some examples of wines that are lighter in body and has more upfront fruit flavors.
    I know Barnyard sounds funny,but it is a component of many layers of flavor,so it actually adds to the complexity of the wine and is a desired nuisance as is Leather and tobacco. The toasted oak,and fruit and acids all come together to make a harmonious wine.
    If it is a fine Graves like Haut-Brion,La Mission Haut-Brion, I would keep the food simple,Roasted meats or stewed meats,Not to heavy on the spice,so the wine controls the stage
    cc
    I just reliezed I said Gamey based wines,I meant GAMAY The grape,sorry

    [This message has been edited by cape chef (edited 01-07-2001).]
     
  15. momoreg

    momoreg

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    You don't think 'peppery" works as a wine term? I have a had lot of wines that fit that description.
     
  16. momoreg

    momoreg

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    oh yeah. sorry 'bout that.
     
  17. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Flabby. It has to be flabby. Excellent word.
     
  18. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Ok kids no cat fights [​IMG]

    Flabby wines are beat,No acid no structure,no taste. It's about balance
    cc
     
  19. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Ok kids no cat fights [​IMG]

    Flabby wines are beat,No acid no structure,no taste. It's about balance
    cc
     
  20. momoreg

    momoreg

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    I just like the word; not the meaning.