Favorite fondant recipe? For molding and covering?

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by jnjsqr, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. jnjsqr

    jnjsqr

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    Hey all!

    I was hoping some people can share their favorite recipes for rolling and molding fondant. Do you find you need different recipes for each purpose? Any thoughts on bought fondant?

    Thanks for any help!
     
  2. loulimar

    loulimar

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    I much prefer home made fondant to the bought stuff - it looks whiter too. I like the straight forward simple recipe below:

    How to make it


    • Place all ingredients into a large bowl, using a wooden spoon mix until a soft dough is formed.
    • Cover your work surface with powdered sugar and knead the icing until it is soft and pliable.
    • If you wish to color the icing use a cocktail stick dipped into the food color knead the icing after to distribute the color evenly, repeat until the desired color is reached!
    Easy peasy /img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif
     
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2012
  3. siduri

    siduri

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    Your question reminded me of when i made my one and only wedding cake and made the fondant a little like the one described here - i was using the Cake Bible and followed this recipe but in the past i had made it by the boiling the sugar and water and scraping and kneading.  I really prefer boiled fondant, but was afraid to try it on such a big cake and such an important one. 

    Does anyone use boiled fondant?  I find the texture so appealing, especially with a soft cake and soft creamy filling. 
     
  4. prettycake

    prettycake Banned

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    I have my own Marshmallow fondant recipe.. very simple:

    1 bag of mini marshmallows

    1 bag of powdered sugar (sifted)

    3 T shortening

    5 T water

    Heat the marshmallow, shortening and water...for about 3 mins in the microwave...until marshmallows puff up.. add the powdered sugar and knead.. let is rest about 1 hour then roll out and use..

     I used Marshmallow fondant on these cakes:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2012
  5. prettycake

    prettycake Banned

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    When you say boiled ,  do you mean the kind you pour over petite fours ?
     
  6. siduri

    siduri

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    Yeah, but you can also knead it and roll it out. 

    you boil sugar and water, in certain proportions, to a certain temperature, pour on marble slab, let it start to cool, then scrape it up with a large metal scraper until it turns white.  It's amazing how it works, and the taste is just sugar, and it has a very interesting texture.  No crap in it, just sugar.  Basically it;s the way fudge is made, without the extra ingredients. 
     
  7. prettycake

    prettycake Banned

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    well whatever works for you..  or floats your boat. 

    When I went to California Culinary Academy (San Francisco) years ago,  we made it w/out the Marshmallow.  It had gelatin,  corn syrup and it was smooth like silk.
     
  8. loulimar

    loulimar

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    [​IMG]

    I made my son's wedding cake using the simple fondant recipe - it was delicious /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif maybe more to the UK taste though!

    I'd like to try the marshmallow fondant recipe - what kind of weight is a bag of marshmallows and a bag of icing sugar?
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2012
  9. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Nice looking cakes Loulimar.

    @ Siduri : My poured fondant is simple: 2/3 to 3/4 cups water, 3 Tbls corn syrup, 2 lbs conf. sugar, 1 tsp almond extract. I heat it till everything melts but does not  get overly hot.  Prior to that the cake has been in freezer, taken out, cut into squares, crumbs removed , then pour melted fondant. Some recipes can get very technical but in all honesty they don't need to be. The joy with making them is in the little accents of decorations.

    [​IMG]  The color and thickness is just like this pic.
     
  10. prettycake

    prettycake Banned

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    Thank you on the info on the POURED   fondant..  I assume that you did NOT  or CANNOT  knead this..
     
  11. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    That is right, there is not much else you can do with it but pour. When I posted,  I had Siduri's idea in mind, not having anything to do with kneading, just basic components.

    Petals.
     
  12. siduri

    siduri

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    Thanks petals, but have you tried poured fondant made with boiled sugar syrup, scraped on a marble counter? 

    i think the texture is something else entirely.  You have to knead it a little, but then you can store it, and take it out and roll out or thin and warm and pour. 

    It cools to be something amazing - chewy. 
     
  13. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Siduri,

    I have not made it that way but I would like to try it so as to get a feel for it. The idea that it cools like that is interesting.

    Petals
     
  14. siduri

    siduri

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    It's kind of magic to make it.  YOu pour the syrup on a slab, let it start to cool, then with a bench scraper, keep scraping it towards the center.  At a certain point you'll find a trace of dry fine crystals on the slab, which is the first crystals that are drying out, and they are tiny, not like the sugar you started with.  The fineness of the crystals is very different from the fineness of powdered sugar.  These are full crystals, but smaller, while the powdered sugar is just ground up crystals.  (Such is my understanding).  It becomes a sort of malleable mass, that has a chewiness.  Have you ever had those afterdinner mints, that look like they were poured into small disk shapes?  they;re sort of chewy.  It also resembles fudge, whicb has the same principle (saturated sugar solution drying out in tiny crystals). 

    I particularly like a soft white cake in layers with whipped cream and strawberries filling it, and a layer of this on top - the sweetness and the chewyness is a nice contrast to the sharpness of the strawberries and the softness of the cream and cake. 
     
  15. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Siduri,

    Now this is something very interesting, the fact that its pliable is fantastic. I like the description you gave about it, as soon as I read it I knew exactly what type of effect this would have. Love the cake you described, right up my alley.

    I'm going to try this out. There are probably other treats that can be used or incorporated.

    Petals.
     
  16. siduri

    siduri

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    Yeah, Petals,

    I used to make it a lot and just keep some in the fridge in a tightly closed container.  The other, made with powdered sugar, has most of the visual qualities, but none of the eating qualities, in my opinion.  When people say they just peel the fondant off of things, they're probably referring to the unboiled version or the commercial versions. 

    I remember a few years ago fondant was unheard of in american baking.  I think it gained popularity because it's a whole lot easier to get a smooth frosting finish on a cake with it than to use buttercream.  But its eating qualities can be an unusual touch to add a layer of texture. 
     
  17. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    I think before fondant it was royal icing. It used to be an event to watch my grandmother pipe with royal. She was raised in Gloucester and as a child , right into her 20's she was very much into cake decorating , mainly with royal. She did some fascinating bridgework, or curtailing as we call it today. Stringwork was her forte along with brush embroidery. Some of her decorated cakes (mostly wedding) would take a few days and she would be at this day/night.

    I never knew how much talent she had. Her sugar mediums were very basic , I guess in its purest form because in those days they only had sugar , egg whites, water to work with. I don't believe there were other ? Chocolate yes, but that is not what I am referring to here.

    Buttercream of course.

    It is incredible to think where the journey of sugar has taken us . In Royal Courts (100 years ago and before ) the pastry Chefs were well ahead of their time. Pulled sugar was a must to work in those kitchens.

    Petals.
     
  18. siduri

    siduri

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    Well, royal icing is great for decorating but not much fun to eat/img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

    your grandmothers cakes sound wonderful. 
     
  19. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Thanks Siduri,

    She was decorating cakes right into her 60's and then stopped. As far as royal goes....looks great but thats about it (she said the same) /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif
     
  20. azusena

    azusena

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    Hi,

    When you said 3 T shortening and 5 T water, did you meant tablespoon or tspn?