Fava Beans

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by wanniesue1982, Apr 29, 2015.

  1. wanniesue1982

    wanniesue1982

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    I came across these beans by the name "fava" in the international market I do much of my shopping in.  I decided to get a couple pounds worth.  My oldest son loves every type of bean and pea so far to hit the table before him.  I figured if I didn't like them maybe he could finish them off.  I did a small amount of research in regards to how to prepare them and I proceeded to work on the beans.  Fava beans are very tasty.  They remind me much of edamame (soybean in the pod).  The texture so smooth with a nice natural flavor so they are tolerable without salt.  The downside.......the yield on fava beans is extremely poor.  Has anyone ever cooked with fava?
     
  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Lots of prep required but lots of flavor.
     
  3. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    If you like the flavor of fava beans, also check out the greens. They are a spring time item with all the taste but not near as laborious as the beans. You can eat them raw or cooked. Lots of cool things to do with them.
     
  4. french fries

    french fries

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    I eat fava beans on a regular basis. I rarely buy 2 pounds though as the cost is high and as you've discovered the yield is low. I usually buy only a little bit for a little salad, or as part of a larger dish such as couscous, a soup or a stew. I also love fried fava beans as a snack, although I use dried fava beans to prepare those: 

     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2015
  5. butzy

    butzy

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    We always ate quite a lot of them as my dad used to grow them.
    I like them.
    He would boil them and then add some bacon and herbs (bonekruid, cant remember the English name)
     
  6. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    @French Fries  those look really yummy.

    What do you fry them in?

    Do you just take them out of the bag, rinse,  dry and then fry?

    Or do the dried favas require rehydration?

    Do tell plz.

    mimi
     
  7. french fries

    french fries

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    First rehydrate in a bowl of cold water for about 24 hours. Then peel them, dry them well, and deep fry in corn oil or any frying oil. And when it comes out of the oil, I add lots of salt and pepper. 

    The tricky part is to get the right temperature, you want them crispy and not soft, but you don't want them hard like pebbles either (I've gone to both extremes and they taste horrible).
     
  8. mike9

    mike9

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    Might be something to try.  I usually brine my beans over night.
     
  9. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    There are fresh, green fava beans and dried fava beans.

    Both are used in Middle Eastern cooking.

    Dried fava beans are used in Ful Medumas (there are many spellings in English, as the name is Arabic) which is the national dish of Egypt. They are cooked and semi-mashed with olive oil, lemon and garlic, much like hummous. A hard boiled egg is often shredded over the top, sometimes chopped tomatoes, sometimes parsley. it is served with pita bread and is common at breakfast. I worked in a fancy Middle Eastern restaurant for awhile. We made our Ful with canned beans and not one Arabic customer ever complained. You can find large and small favas in cans at any Middle Eastern market.

    Fresh green fava beans are a pain. Totally. I cheat. Many of the markets that sell Middle Eastern or other international foods will have raw, shelled,  green favas in the frozen food case. That's what I buy.

    One caveat--people who are prone to Migraine who need to avoid foods high in the amine Tyramine should avoid them as should people on an old class of anti-depressant medications called Mono-amine Oxidase Inhibitors. Almost no-one takes MAOIs anymore since newer drugs are available, though. The amine can trigger migraines and may interact with MAOI drugs in such a way as to cause a hypertensive reaction. 
     
  10. thatchairlady

    thatchairlady

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    I don't see them fresh very often.  When I did, I bought a big big... relatively cheap at farmer's market.  Knew there would be work involved in prepping.  For me, way too much work... flavor was nice but not worth the time.  Same thing happened when I came across fresh garbanzos.
     
  11. french fries

    french fries

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    You have to approach the work with a Zen attitude. If it's just something to get out of the way before you can start cooking, then you're right, it's not worth it. But if you take pleasure in it, trying to do it right, without damaging the beans, it can become a fun activity. I like to share it with my kids or wife. Such activities calm me, and I can therefore enjoy them. But it's definitely a labor of love. 

    As for the price, I find fresh organic ones here for $4/lbs, which is quite expensive when you consider the poor yield. So I only splurge once in a while and buy one lbs top. 
     
  12. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    For anyone interested in an easy but delicious preparation, try roasted fava beans. Whole pod, sprinkle with s&p, toss with olive oil. Spread in single layer and roast 450 for 25 minutes. Pop out of pods and enjoy.
     
  13. french fries

    french fries

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    Cool! I'll have to try that. So you eat the skin then? 
     
  14. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Yes. The pods will turn dark and even looked burned in spots, but no worries. Also the reason to oil and s&p the pods even though you don't eat the pods is because as you pop the beans out of the pods after cooking, the oil and s&p will coat your fingers and transfer the roasted seasoning flavor to the beans.
     
  15. french fries

    french fries

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    I was going to ask... and what you're describing is the experience I've had with salted edamame pods. Sounds like a fun snack, I'll try it soon!
     
  16. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Just added favas to my shopping list.

    Will it be sacrilegious if we eat this instead of roasted peanuts while watching baseball?

    Do you think this sub will break the Astros winning streak?

    mimi
     
  17. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Speaking of the Astros....

    I cannot find my rally monkey... autographed by Craig Biggio himself.

    Stuck one of the Grands up at the rail with the brand new monkey and a sharpie.

    I realize this is behavior of the lowest sort but it was his 3000 hit year!!!!

    Have turned the house upside down and even checked Ebay.

    Nope. Nada. Nowhere.

    mimi