Far Far indian snacks

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Hear is a description of the packet

Ingredience say; wheat flour 96%. salt 3%.
You are supposed to fry them and when you fry them they puff up like this

But what makes them puff up? there is no way that frying off pasta tubs will puff like this no matter how much baking power it contains
 
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Looking at a similar product’s wiki, we can learn the following:

“Prawn crackers are made by mixing prawns, tapioca flour and water. The mixture is rolled out, steamed, and sliced. Traditionally, to achieve maximum crispiness, raw crackers are usually sun-dried first before frying, to eliminate the moisture. Once dry, they are deep-fried in oil (which must be at high heat before cooking). In only a few seconds they expand from thumb-sized semi-transparent wafers to white fluffy crackers, much like popcorn, as water bound to the starch expands as it turns into steam.”

There are many puffed products that use similar puffing mechanism.
 

phatch

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I don't think so. They're too stiff for baking powder to leaven. They behave like asian shrimp chips do. It seems to be more the starch swelling and puffing kind of like popcorn does from a compressed state. If that's true, there is residual water flashing to steam.

I haven't found an authoritative explanation yet
 

phatch

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Or the classic fried mung bean starch noodles. Fried from dried rather than boiled into their cellophane/glass noodle usage.
 
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It has to be baking powder which is making them puff. Pasta doesn't contain baking powder.
But what made you come to the conclusion that its baking powder? is it because I mentioned it in the OP?
I have actully tried mixing baking powder and flour on a 50/50 mix as an experiment. And it did not not raise the way that the far far tube have done when it was fired
 
101
6
Joined Jul 7, 2020
Looking at a similar product’s wiki, we can learn the following:

“Prawn crackers are made by mixing prawns, tapioca flour and water. The mixture is rolled out, steamed, and sliced. Traditionally, to achieve maximum crispiness, raw crackers are usually sun-dried first before frying, to eliminate the moisture. Once dry, they are deep-fried in oil (which must be at high heat before cooking). In only a few seconds they expand from thumb-sized semi-transparent wafers to white fluffy crackers, much like popcorn, as water bound to the starch expands as it turns into steam.”

There are many puffed products that use similar puffing mechanism.
So are you saying that removing all the water contence is what will make them puff up in the fryer?
 
101
6
Joined Jul 7, 2020
I don't think so. They're too stiff for baking powder to leaven. They behave like asian shrimp chips do. It seems to be more the starch swelling and puffing kind of like popcorn does from a compressed state. If that's true, there is residual water flashing to steam.

I haven't found an authoritative explanation yet
So what starch is there flour?
 

phatch

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Wheat flour is 68-76% starch.

 
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Wheat flour is 68-76% starch.

I did the 50/50 flour-baking soda experiment with "plain flour" which says its wheat on the back of it. Which did not puff up!

Should I look at doing it again and removing as much water content as possible?
 

phatch

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It's not just starch alone. The structure of the product has to hold the steam until the pressure is sufficient to puff from the steam. There is non-trivial preparation, compression and drying. That you can't recreate it at home from scratch isn't too surprising.

But all you asked is why they puff. I think we explained that.
 
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Oy... this as frustrating as every other thread you start. LOL

The starch needs to gelatinized.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starch_gelatinization

And as it applies to a similar product (from Wikipedia):
Prawn crackers are made by mixing prawns, tapioca flour and water. The mixture is rolled out, steamed, and sliced. Traditionally, to achieve maximum crispiness, raw crackers are usually sun-dried first before frying, to eliminate the moisture. Once dry, they are deep-fried in oil (which must be at high heat before cooking). In only a few seconds they expand from thumb-sized semi-transparent wafers to white fluffy crackers, much like popcorn, as water bound to the starch expands as it turns into steam.
 
101
6
Joined Jul 7, 2020
It's not just starch alone. The structure of the product has to hold the steam until the pressure is sufficient to puff from the steam. There is non-trivial preparation, compression and drying. That you can't recreate it at home from scratch isn't too surprising.
I still just dont understand how they are being done. Do I need special equipment to do it or something?
 
101
6
Joined Jul 7, 2020
And as it applies to a similar product (from Wikipedia):
Prawn crackers are made by mixing prawns, tapioca flour and water. The mixture is rolled out, steamed, and sliced. Traditionally, to achieve maximum crispiness, raw crackers are usually sun-dried first before frying, to eliminate the moisture. Once dry, they are deep-fried in oil (which must be at high heat before cooking). In only a few seconds they expand from thumb-sized semi-transparent wafers to white fluffy crackers, much like popcorn, as water bound to the starch expands as it turns into steam.
So to do it. Do I need a sreamer? Will sun drying them out not be enough?
 
4,044
859
Joined Dec 18, 2010
You really need to read the article on gelatinization.

Like pate Chou, the starch needs to be cooked. Steaming is one way; cooking on stove is another.

But, honestly... many commercial products are just to hard to replicate outside of the factory. Is this what tour real goal is, or did you just want to understand why they puff?
 
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