Fancy new steak like the French make

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by benrias, May 26, 2005.

  1. benrias

    benrias

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    OK...just so that we are not getting repetitive, I will leave out the identifying info where I got this from. BUUUUUUUUT will anyone tell me if "Coffee Crusted Beef Tenderloin" sounds good to you?
     
  2. benrias

    benrias

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    Oh yeah...dont forget to make the Goat cheese mashed potatoes with Beef coffee gravy [people I am not making this up...these are real recipes from a real TV show]
     
  3. markv

    markv

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    OK, we all know it's from Sandra Lee's show.

    I think those recipes are absolutely gross, reagardless of how the final product tastes.

    Mark
     
  4. chrose

    chrose

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    Yeah I gotta agre with MarkV, sounds pretty nasty to me. In the never ending quest for new flavor combinations some people will do anything without a sound knowledge or clue as to what they're doing. :mad:
     
  5. miahoyhoy

    miahoyhoy

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    About 7 years ago I used to do a coffee encrusted filet of bison tenderloin (filet mignon) with a vanilla hazelnut demi glace. Served it with garlic mashed.
    Was very good. I still do it from time to time. The trick is to not burn the coffee crust when cooking it.
     
  6. kerryclan

    kerryclan

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    Lee ripped the recipe off of the great chef Robert del Grande and then added her ineptness to it and ruined it. The rest of the fare was equally appalling.

    ...I think you guys know how I feel about this show, so I'll leave it at that.
     
  7. markv

    markv

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    Here's another nasty steak seasoning: dusting a steak with cocoa powder.

    That was on the menu Valentine's week for the cooking classes I teach. (An outside firm picks the menu).

    In my mind, the goal of creating a "Valentines" theme came at the expense of culinary propriety.

    I personally think that's a gross combo and a desecration of good meat.

    I abandoned the chocolate steak and showed the class how to make a cognac-cream sauce with green peppercorns instead. They loved it.

    Mark
     
  8. markv

    markv

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    PS to Kerryclan:

    Awwww go ahead, tell us again what you think of Sandra Lee.

    I could use a good laugh.

    Mark :p
     
  9. kerryclan

    kerryclan

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    ...not fit for print, Mark. :p
     
  10. chrose

    chrose

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    I was thinking that when I made my comment perhaps I was a bit hasty in making it sound like I was writing that using coffee and the like was from people who were clueless. I wanted it to come across that yes, using things like coffee and other "unusual" ingredients in "odd" places was fine if it came from a person of knowledge. I rail against the fools that see something unusual and just go ahead and wing it without any real footing in knowledge and reality before going ahead because it's trendy in some way. I offer up two examples:
    • First when I worked at a "Gourmet" dessert manufacturer they tried to develop a BIG Espresso cake using chocolate and real Espresso. The idea was okay, but as I was scooping the icing into the filling machine I noticed little black granules against the sides of the bowl. When I tasted it I realized they actually put the Espresso grounds into the icing. I don't mean a little! Every bite was gritty and nasty, but would they listen to me to use either concentrated Espresso or Espresso powder? Noooo.......... Ecchh!!!
    • Next was a Chef I worked with who was a bit of a drinker and had an odd fetish for Smoked Gouda cheese. He asked me one night as he was trying to come up with a special for the evening, he said "How about a grilled tenderloin filet with Adobo sauce, a smoked Oyster and smoked Gouda cheese!
    I told him that was seriously nasty and not to do it. Thankfully "he" listened to me! :rolleyes:
     
  11. redace1960

    redace1960

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    isn't coffee gravy what they used to call redeye? my grandmother used to make something like that-fry ham, reserve juice, deglaze the pan with black coffee, juice back and thicken with flour and ham fat roux. or is the wicked cow just dumping coffee into a pot with some cornstarch? bleahhhhh! (don't watch her; one viewing was more than enough. nice boobs and scarred fingers notwithstanding, markv!)
     
  12. kerryclan

    kerryclan

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    No, not redeye. Your second choice is more like it, only add instant coffee to the cornstarch and some beef broth (canned, of course) and no deglazing.

    I'm now in a 12-step program to overcome my SLop obsessive-repulsive disorder, so I should be O.K. soon and not need to watch anymore.
     
  13. markv

    markv

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    I agree

    Mark
     
  14. mikelm

    mikelm

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    No, Redace, that IS redeye gravy. Pour off any juice from the ham-frying pan, deglaze with black coffee, put back the juice and some thickener, and pour over the ham slices and THE GRITS.

    My authority is the instructions for cooking my annual Christmas Missouri country ham from Esicar's Smokehouse in Cape Girardeau. As the saying goes, they know country ham and how to serve it.

    Don't forget the grits!

    We're having several couples from Sweden in a couple weeks as guests for the Rotary International Convention in Chicago; I'm going to serve my couple that breakfast of Missouri ham, redeye, and grits (and several other typical, regional breakfasts.) The next evening, the local host group is going to produce a complete Thanksgiving dinner with ALL the trimmings, to give them an idea of American culinary traditions.

    But, no grits for Thanksgiving.

    Should be fun.

    Mike :chef:
     
  15. nowiamone

    nowiamone

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    One of my most popular menu items is a steakwith a coffee (very finely ground) and five star powder rub. We grill it and serve in a puddle of seasoned cream gravy. It has a big following. We call it our "caffe latte" steak.
     
  16. redace1960

    redace1960

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    nowiamone.....
    step on over to the recipes forum and post the how to for that one, if you would please? that really struck me right! it sounds delicious!!
    i'm still having trouble with the whole coffee cooked on steak concept though- could someone explain the how to on that because all i keep envisioning is a tarry, sweet, charred mess. (probably because i do my steaks philly style.)
     
  17. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Just picked up this month's "Food Arts" and the opening picture on an article about a new steakhouse was of Coffee crusted Ribeye.