Famous Sandwiches from Famous Cities

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kuan, Aug 14, 2010.

  1. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    And maybe not so famous?

    My favorite famous sandwich is from Chicago.  It's called the Maxwell Street Polish.   A Polish sausage that's split open, chargrilled, and served with grilled onions.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2010
  2. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    There is a small corner rest. right off of Jean Talon, no great advertisement, in fact if you were driving by you would not even notice it. But in that little Mama and Pop joint, they sell the most mouthwatering sandwich, it is pulled pork - almost caramelized, topped with some type of habenero relish, pickles, a vinegary slaw, a house mayo, served on a freshly baked Portuguese bun.....

    it can do many things to you.....it just sings in your mouth.

    ps. I will not even get into their grilled Haloumi with mint sauce....(it can outrun Forrest Gump)
     
  3. maryb

    maryb

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    Sandwich that was served in a cafe in Springfield, MN. I am not sure if it is still there anymore.

    * Exported from MasterCook *

                               Springfield Sandwich

    Recipe By     :Mary Brown
    Serving Size  : 2     Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories    : Sandwiches

      Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method

     
     

      2             slices  sourdough bread -- butter one side
      2          teaspoons  butter -- for the bread
         1/3         pound  beef chuck roast -- Use leftover roast, thin sliced steak, leftover smoked beef, or deli beef
      1                cup  beef stock -- simmering
         1/4           cup  Thousand Island salad dressing
      4             slices  Swiss Cheese
      1             medium  tomato -- sliced thin

    Butter one side of the bread and lay it in a frying pan butter side down (a panini press works great too).

    Lay swiss cheese on the bread.

    Top only 1 of the slices of bread with the beef that has been warmed in a stock

    Spread the Thousand Island Dressing on the beef.

    Top the beef with the tomato slices.

    Fry on medium low until the bread is nicely browned, I use a cover to make the cheese melt better.

    Flip the bread slice with just the cheese onto the rest of the sandwich.
     
  4. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    The sandwiches I most associate with L.A.: 
    • French Dip -- Supposedly created at Philippe's, 1918, by the man himself, Phillipe Mathieu.  Cole's Pacific Electric Buffet, also founded in 1908, disputes the claim, and says the dip was invented there.  I take no position, but Philippe's won the battle with tourists.
    • Chili Dog -- Supposedly created at Pink's, 1939, by Paul Pink.
    • Chili burgers -- Supposedly created at Tommy's, 1946, by Tommy Koufax
    Pink's and Tommy's are still in the same locations, although Pink's upgraded from cart to "stand," around 1945.  And Tommy's, spun off a bunch of unaffiliated clones -- many founded by ex-employees, some of which became chaines in their own right -- before becoming a chain in its own right.  Philippe's moved to its new, current spot in 1927.

    Philippe's mustard, practically defines "pleaure-pain."  It is so wrong and yet so very right.

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2010
  5. cape chef

    cape chef

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    A muffuletta I had back in 2005 in New Orleans at the central grocery.
     
  6. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Corned beef on rye and a bagel with a smear comes from New York lower east side circa 1915-21. Brought over from Eastern Europe in peoples heads.
     
  7. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Kuan, how can you mention Chicago and not mention an Italian Beef from Al's?  CC, I also agree with you on the muffuletta, one of my all time favorites, although a Brat served on a Sheboygan Hard Roll is way up there also.
     
  8. benway

    benway

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    I'd put the Sheboygan style brat up against anything anywhere.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. gypsy2727

    gypsy2727

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    California Sandwich...Toronto Ontario since 1967....opened up as a grocery store and the Veal on a Bun was flying outta their faster than the groceries!....The mamas are still there frying in a pan your veal to order. Sauce is homeade on the stove you can look back in the kitchen and see the sauce on the simmer...oh the aroma!..Original location is on Claremont street in Toronto and I would highly suggest that one, to get the real feel of the original Veal. So authentic sooooo italian...that is one of the places I miss the most in Toronto...

    get the freshly grilled hot peppers  in your sandwich.....sooooo good
     
  10. rat

    rat

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    What about the philly cheesesteak??
     
  11. rpmcmurphy

    rpmcmurphy

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    NJ's Porkroll Egg & Cheese on a hardroll. (not a 'hard' roll)
     
  12. bughut

    bughut

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    Firstly,one i've tried and remember fondly... Make that 2.  Newcastle UK- wee van by the tyne on market day serves pulled pork on a huge bun called a stottie.You can get gravy,onions and sage and onion stuffing on it

    #2 is a shrimp poboy again in New Orleans

    There are then the ones I dearly want to try...We now have, on cablein UK a programme called man v food. OH BOY!   some of the concoctions American diners come up with are truly amazing...Long, long roasted beef sliced wafer thin and piled high on a bun.Topped with cheeses and onions  then gloriously dunked into the unctious broth the beef was cooked in. To quote Ina (scary wifey) Garten "How could you not love that"

    Just thought of another...Portugal. - bbq'd sardines. Bones out, heads n tails on, drizzled with oil and salt and slapped in a bun...Excellent
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2010
  13. mikelm

    mikelm

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    Ummm...

    Benway - I'm sorry...

    "I'd put the Sheboygan style brat up against anything anywhere."

    No, we were in Sheboygan several years ago and naturally had to sample the local specialty. It was a pretty high-class hotel dining dining room  and... that brat couldn't hold a candle to the brats made at Randy Ream's  Elburn Market in (suprise!) Elburn, Illinois.  It's on Illinois Route 47 about 10 miles west of Geneva IL, and about 40 miles west of Chicago.

    The walls of his market are entirely covered with awards for his sausages, mostly for the bratwurst- but ALL his sausages are just marvelous.

    You're not that far away. Take a nice drive in the country, bring a BIG cooler, and go crazy.  Everything he makes is outstanding.  On summer Saturdays, he has a grill out front cooking sausages and burgers, so you could have lunch, too. If it's not Saturday, there's a biker bar around the corner called "Knucklehead's" which makes an awsome cheeseburger.

    Downtown Elburn is all of two blocks long, so you won't have much truoble finding the Elburn Market. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif

    It's a trip well worth making, and will open your eyes to the best in charcuterie.

    Bon voyage

    Mike  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif

    In late May, I was there buying 900 brats and 900 of his all-beef, natural-casing hot dogs for our Rotary Club's fund-raisers for the summer. Randy supplies most of the northeastern Illinois Rotary clubs their fund-raising sausages - all at a very good price. He's a very good man as well as one hel! of a sausagemaker.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2010
  14. critical647

    critical647

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    Forget cheesesteaks in Philly, they are for tourists.  Philly has absolutely to-die-for pork sandwiches, the best of which I have had has been from a place in Reading Terminal Market called Tommy DiNic's.  If you ever go there get the ITALIAN PULLED PORK sandwich with broccoli rabe, not the roast pork.  I recommend it without sharp provolone cheese so all you get is the flavor of the meat, but that is up to you.  
     
  15. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Hah!  I was just waiting for someone to mention it.  :)  Don't want to monopolize the conversation.

    Does anyone remember the grilled salmon on San Francisco sourdough at the wharf in SF?
     
  16. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    St Paul sandwich in St. Louis.....egg foo young, slice of onion, dill pickle,tomato, mayo, lettuce, white "squishy" bread.  sold at chop suey joints circa 1940's

    Memphis, BBQ with cole slaw together on a bun......

    Ferdi, Mothers in New Orleans....sliced ham, sliced roast beef, cabbage, and piece da' resistance...debris (gravy with bits of roast beef)....

    There are the shacks in the bayou that serve french fry po'boys with gravy
     
  17. soigneky

    soigneky

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    Does open-faced count? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_Brown

    Forget the imitations.  Without the Mornay, it doesn't count.  I did once have a Hot Brown pizza that was surprisingly tasty...
     
  18. chefross

    chefross

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    Man does that bring back memories. We used to drive to Sheboygan for those littles gems, cook them in beer, au jus and grilled onions. AND, just to let you know how long ago it was.....Schlitz beer was the breakfast of champions...
     
     
  19. chefross

    chefross

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    Back to the nature of the thread...in Chicago, the now defunct Marshall Fields used to make an awesome sandwich called

    The Continental. It was open-faced and included ham, turkey, 1,000 island dressing, swiss cheese, PLOT (pickle, lettuce, onion, and tomato...) and for the life of me I can't remember the bread....but it was a hit for decades.

    An Italian beef with sweet peppers and provolone cheese is to die for while in Chicago.
     
  20. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    We used to eat at Marshall Fields about once a month back in the 1950s and I remember a sandwich very similar, though the name does not ring a bell, I remember something on the order of "Marshall Fields Special" or some such.

    IIRC, the bread was rye or pumpernickel, whatever, IT WAS GOOD!