extreme temperatures

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by junglist, May 4, 2013.

  1. junglist

    junglist

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    Not talking about food, but about us who work in the kitchen... especially on the line.

    One of the first kitchens I worked in, the cooks working the line always had other staff run into the walk-ins or freezers when something was needed. The reason was if someone was subject to the extreme heat of working the line, that the sudden change in temperature of going into the walk-in/freezer would cause damage to the inner body; I even remember something about the possibility of liquid building up in the lungs? Even after leaving this job, I heard one of the bakers had died because of this scenario. Ever since I've somewhat followed this belief.

    Fast forward some 10 years, in the middle of a Friday dinner service our 'chef consultant' pulls me off the line to do his orders with him. We end up in our walk-in, and he's standing there explaining his method (I've done this 10+ times with him already) going on and on. Partly I was tired of hearing it again for the umpteenth time, and partly concerned for my health, I told him it wasn't safe for me standing in the walk-in having been working on the line for hours. He gave me a confused look and tells me he's never heard of such a thing. This also makes him realize I just want to get back to my station, and let's me go.

    So am I victim to an urban myth? Or is there any validity to this?
     
  2. kostendorf

    kostendorf

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    i have a old but clean winter jacket that i use to work in the walk in freezer. all i know is the Change of temperature from hot to extreme cold makes some parts of my Body tight..  i also have a hat when doing inventory there.  never heard of it being life threatening but if you are prone to chest colds i would suggest a scarf or jacket when working in the freezer
     
  3. wurzel

    wurzel

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    If you have asthma it can set you off into coughing fits as the nerves in your lungs are more sensitive than other people's. Other than this there wouldn't be any negative health impact from rapid change of temperature, your body is a lot more resilient than you're giving it credit for.
     
  4. cacioepepe

    cacioepepe

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    This is ridiculous.  Grow a pair and find something else to worry about.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2013
    sherman452 likes this.
  5. michaelga

    michaelga

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    The hot-cold environment and fluid building up in your lungs is an old wives tale trying to explain pneumonia (which is an infection).  

    If it was true everybody in Northern Climates would drown every winter when you repeatedly come in from -20C outside to +20C inside.

    Colds and Flu are caused by bacteria and viruses - not temperature changes.

    Going from 30C line station to a -15C freezer is uncomfortable but it isn't going to kill you or make you sick.  (it might aggravate an already existing condition though)
     
  6. shichangchu

    shichangchu

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    I actually posed this question to my doctor and he said it had more to do with how long you would be in the cooler. If you were to be in the cooler for awhile, it is possible to catch a cold or something to that effect if you have been working to the point that you are sweating a lot. It's the basic principle of your body being wet and then going into a cold space which makes you even colder than you would normally be; like going outside in the winter with a wet head of hair. He said it's not anything to wrory about unless there is some preexisting condition. It isn't something that would deteriorate your body over time. 

    There are rare instances of people going from one extreme to another suffering heart attacks but under those circumstances, it's people with a serious heart condition or some other kind of condition.
     
  7. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    The hubs subscribes to the "don't wash your hair and then go to bed with the ac/fan on or you will surely fall ill and die" old wive's tale.

    I have carelessly broken his rule my entire life and here I am...still alive and kickin'.

    So this is my retort.....if you DON"T wash your hair before going to bed you will find yourself a very lonely and frustrated man with greasy hair, lol.

    mimi
     
  8. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    So then the Nordic tradition of a sauna followed by a roll in the snow must be close to fatal, huh? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif
     
  9. wurzel

    wurzel

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    Sorry but no.

    You absolutely can not catch a cold from being cold for too long. The common cold and flu are viruses, you catch them from other people, nothing to do with temperature. The only thing that extreme cold will cause is hypothermia and you would certainly get out of the walk in long before that sets in.
     
    brandon odell likes this.