Extracts

isa

3,236
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Joined Apr 4, 2000
I walked into a spice store this afternoon that had the wildest selection of extracts. A whole wall of extract, an extract heaven really. There was so many different kind, all pure and natural the owner assured me. I’m not so sure it’s natural, specially after smelling an electric blue blueberry extract. It didn’t really smell of blueberry. The cinnamon extract did have a nice cinnamon aroma. It’s the only one I bought today. I wanted to look into it just to make sure one can really make natural butter, anise or amaretto extract.

Is this really possible?
 
579
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Joined May 6, 2001
I did a search online but only found more extracts for sale-nothing about how they make them. I know you can make your own vanilla by putting one or two split beans in bourbon, cognac or rum and allowing them to "steep" for several months in a dark bottle. I think that this technique would also work for anise and cinnamon. I don't know how they could make a butter extract that wasn't artificial.
 

isa

3,236
11
Joined Apr 4, 2000
They use alcohol to make extracts. It's an evaporation process. That's why they can make translucid vanilla. They do this with liqueurs too. And oil must be made in a simmilar fashion.

You can find oil to flavour candies. A lot of them are artifical but some like cinnamon, nutmeg or peppermint are the real thing. I guess extracts could be made from those spices. But pineapple extract or strawberry? Butter extract? You're right Svad, it sounds too weird.


P.S. I wish I knew a chemist who could analyse a few of those extracts...
 
2,068
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Joined Dec 30, 1999
Check here at the Essential Oil Dictionary. It's not exactly what you're looking for but it may provide some insight in the meantime... explains extraction methods for many familiar
essential oils...

;)
 
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Joined Apr 24, 2001
Fascinating information. Just last week, I told my chef that if I came into some money, I'd buy an alhambric still so that I can make my own flower waters. Jasmine, violet, lemon flower waters are impossible to come by. He did perk up a little when I told him I'd make a bottle of lavender water for him to bathe in. As soon as I get the still, I'll worry about finding enough flowers.
 
1,389
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Joined Jul 24, 2001
I thought that the extracting process was a chemical one anyway and the phrase " natural extract" is an oxymoron.

I am very much interested in this subject because I love extracts. I just want to have them and look at them and smell them and I got very jealous of this electric blue blueberry extract...

I forwarded our question in a living person and we will see what he will reply!

edited to correct the uncountable typos...
 

isa

3,236
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Joined Apr 4, 2000
Cchiu I can't thank you enough for all this information. Can't wait to read it all.

It does explain how you can make extracts but I am still mystify by the butter extract. Surely it can't be as simple as adding ether to butter???


Would you like a bottle of blueberry extract Athenaeus?
 

isa

3,236
11
Joined Apr 4, 2000
I looked further into extracts and found some strange things out there. Anyone need mushroom extract?

Extract and essential oil are made in a similar fashion often distillation. Oil are four time stronger than extract. An artificial flavouring can not be called extract or natural oil. Since that is not always the case, you’ll have to look at the ingredient lists to be certain it’s the real thing.

Finally, “butter extract” is always artificial, as far as I could say. The main market for it seems to be in the US, you see little of it elsewhere.
 
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Joined Jul 24, 2001
I am still looking for this issue!

I was promised some tips about cooking with essential oils!!!
 
1,006
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Joined Feb 6, 2002
What about "Mixed Essence"? That is used widely in the Caribbean, in fact whenever a baking recipe calls for vanilla we always use "mixed essence". I have no clue what's in that stuff. I just know it gives our pudding (actually a cake similar to pound) an extra punch.
 

isa

3,236
11
Joined Apr 4, 2000
Is there a list of ingredients on the bottle Cat?



Svad, I always have a bottle or two of vanilla curing in the cupboards. Lately I decided to push things a bit further are try to make other extracts. I did ginger which turned out better than I had hope for. Maybe I should try blueberry extract.


Would an espresso coffee maker replace an alambic?
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Isa,

Can you make the blueberry extract with the dried blueberries you bought? Or did you eat them all by now? :lol:
 

isa

3,236
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Joined Apr 4, 2000
I was just thinking about them earlier wondering what would work best fresh or dry fruits. ;)
 
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Joined Mar 7, 2002
Dear Abby was fascinated by this topic so she asked her own dear Chef Henri. Henri, it turns out swears by the Boyajian line of essential oils.

Henri purchases the all-natural Boyajian Pure Citrus Oils and other spice oils at our local Whole Foods Market, but I understand that they can be ordered online. http://www.boyajianinc.com

When pressed to name a single favorite, Henri highly recommends the Boyajian Pure Orange Oil, and Abby concurs. It has the most heavenly fragrance, as well it should, it is pressed from fresh oranges! It may be used sparingly in many recipes in place of orange zest. What can one do with the orange oil, you ask? Well, Henri suggests adding 1/4 teaspoon of the orange oil per cup of whipped, unsalted butter or cream cheese and spread on a hot croissant. Divine!

Or, use just a touch in sauces, salad dressings, cheesecakes, frostings or glazes. Henri is happy to share this very simple muffin recipe with the readers of Chef Talk. This is not original; Henri got this recipe from the label of a 5-ounce bottle of Boyajian Orange Oil. Abby wishes you could smell these muffins as they bake!


Orange Walnut Muffins

3 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/4 cups sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/4 cups milk
3/4 cup vegetable oil
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons Boyajian Pure Orange Oil
1 1/2 cups chopped walnuts

Preheat oven to 350. Line standard muffin tins with foil or paper cupcake liners.

Combine flour, sugar and baking powder in large mixing bowl. In separate bowl, mix milk, vegetable oil, eggs and orange oil. Stir milk mixture into dry ingredients (do not over mix). Gently fold in chopped walnuts.

Divide batter into 18 muffin cups. Bake for 20 minutes. Transfer muffins to rack. Serve warm.
 
1,389
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Joined Jul 24, 2001
Dear Abby this was another great recipe coming from you. Muchos thanks.

The more I research on extracts, the more confused I become.

I want to pose a question to the chefs and the pastry chefs.

Theoritically speaking, the extracts are the magic answer to everything!!

Let's say that we haven't succeded in giving a good taste in our dish, I mean, if the taste is weak, the solution hides in this tiny bottle!!

Right or not????

In Europe , people are very interested that their cookies and pastries have the distinctive smell of fresh butter.

Many people use the butter extract to enhance the taste.

What do you think??

Personally I consider these practises, cooking of bad quality .

Am I wrong?
 
4,508
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Joined Jul 31, 2000
I make this oil for light seafood, and some poultry dishes

Carrot-cinnamon oil

2 T ground cinnamon
2 t wtaer
1 cup conola oil
1 cinnamon stick
10 medium carrots pelled
a couple drops of sherry vinager

Mix the ground cinnamon with the water to a smooth paste, put the paste in a clean jar. add the oil and shake well, add the cinnamon stick. let it sit until the oil seperates from the solids.

Remove the oil from the top with a ladle making sure not to stir up the solids.

filter the oil trough a paper coffee filter and toss the solids.
Put the carrots through a juice extractor (you need about 2 cups)

In a small sauce pan, reduce the carrot juice to 1 cup, strain through a fine mesh strainer into another sauce pan and reduce to a syrup, (1/2 cup or so)stir in 1/4 cup of your cinnamon oil and mix well and season with a couple drops of the sherry vinager.
 
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Joined Jul 24, 2001
Cape Chef

Would you use an extract to improve the taste of a dish that you wouldn't consider "succesfull"

The question goes to all the profesionals of course.
 
4,508
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Joined Jul 31, 2000
Honestly Athenaues,

I don't cook with the type of extracts you are refering to,albeit, certian extracts are used in my pastry department, mostly all from the Mentha family (mints).

I do however, make many different type of infused oils, vinagers and juices. I don't use these to uplift a dish, I use them as an intricale part of the preparation.

This time of year I try to lighten things up on my menus, and these dry spice or herb oils and vinagers, juices as well do the trick.

You would be suprised how elegant a piece of poached halibut with a little beet-horseradish oil, and a chive emulsion taste.

They are very easy and inexpensive to make. I have alot of recipes for these type of infusions if anyone would like me to share them.

I really fell in love with this technique when I dined years ago at the Drake hotel in New York city (at least I think it was the drake) Jean George Vongericthen was the chef thier, I still remember his black cod with osetra quenelle with a simple parsley root and carrot oils.

I hope this answered your question a bit
cc
 
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