Expert Pastry Chef for Refining Recipes?

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by camilamdingdong, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. camilamdingdong

    camilamdingdong

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    Hello!

    My sister and I are developing some Swedish family recipes that we envision turning into a business - selling pastries and such to local cafes, etc.

    We want to put a gourmet spin on these recipes, but for the life of us, we can't even get the basic recipes to turn out right.

    Is there a way to hire an expert pastry baker to develop these recipes and then show us the technique in making them well?

    Thanks!
     
  2. thetincook

    thetincook

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    Line Cook
    Yes, write me a check :p
     
  3. camilamdingdong

    camilamdingdong

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    :)

    I suppose there's a compensation range, depending upon the baker's experience... Any idea of what that range would be for an hourly contractor?

    Do you suppose it's necessary that they have experience in Swedish pastries, or is baking baking?

    Thx!
     
  4. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Recipies based on what?

    5 qt k.a mixer or a 30 qt Hobart?

    Convection oven or a deck oven?

    Dough sheeter,or roll out by hand?

    Shelf life?

    Labeling?

    Costing?
     
  5. camilamdingdong

    camilamdingdong

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    Seeing as they're family recipes, they assume doing everything by hand within a home oven.  We will be leasing a commercial oven, but the overall operation will initially be modest in quantity made and equipment purchased.  Shelf life would be similar to other pastrys that cafes or stores have on display under glass.  We would supply them to these places the same day/morning that they are made.  I don't understand what is being asked for in regards to labeling and costing.

    Thanks!
     
  6. foodpump

    foodpump

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    When you sell to Cafe's/restaurants you are competeing with Costco, Sam's, large purveyors,(Sysco, US Foods) large bakeries, bakery suppliers, and even meat and seafood purveyors.  Most, if not all is frozen, and most, if not all, has a thawed shelf life of over a week..

    With wholesale, price is the deciding factor, not quality.  Therefore your products must be priced to compete with the frozen, mass produced cheesecakes and stamped fruit pies. This is costing, how much will your product cost to produce (ingredients, labour,  overhead, packaging, delivery) It takes clever purchasing and good kitchen organization to do this, and you can't get good prices at the local supermarket for your ingredients.  The larger quantities you buy, the cheaper it becomes, and your competitors are buying thier ingredients by the truck-load.

    After a few delivieries you will realize that it is practical to bake in large quantities to save time and labour, for example: You can make 6 10" cakes in the same time it takes to make 1 cake, and after a few deliveries you will realize it isn't worth your effort to start if the order isn't above $150.00.

    Hope this helps 
     
  7. camilamdingdong

    camilamdingdong

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    Thank you for your input.  I believe we have different understandings on certain points; but your advice is noted and helpful.
     
  8. chefedb

    chefedb

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    When selling your finished product, you can either stress Quality or Price, either route. You can't serve quality cheap... Also before you start Know your market and what it can afford or not afford.and what demand will be. Come up with a business plan of soughts.