everything i need and knife skills???

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by mrbushido, Oct 18, 2014.

  1. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Hello got a konosuke hd2 270mm gyuto and a 210 tojiro shirogami gyuto and a 220mm victorinox chefs knife and a 150mm tojiro shirogami petty.

    Stones 220 king 1000 king 3000 naniwa superstone and 6000 king

    And a ceramic hone.

    Also gonna order a boardsmith end grain board next month.

    Thats everything i need i feel or??
    Just cuts vegetables and boneless protein.


    So my knifeskills is pretty slow and bad any good tips to learn or some tips?
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    First is safety, then technique, efficiency, and with practice you'll finally pick up some speed.

    If you're working with an uncommon shape, stop to think about what you're doing. Ex. You need a fine dice of bell pepper. You can cut off four sides, julienne then dice. You could cut the ends off, roll it out and de seed at the same time the julienne and dice. A beginner might try to cut from the top and deseed and then just rock chop/ mince it. It wouldn't be very fast or consistent.

    Think about when you want to guillotine and glide or push cut or pull cut.

    Consider board management. Where are you cutting? Where to place products out of the way when you are done?

    Don't rush it, speed comes from experience and good technique.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2014
  3. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Also about that board management thing.. I used to stand squared up to the board and cut at a diagonal with my product also diagonal to the board. You lose a lot of space this way. Now I stand with my left foot forward and cut square to the board. Much more usable space.
     
  4. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Okay know any good places to learn knife skills?
     
  5. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    http://www.craftsy.com/class/complete-knife-skills/560 is a good start for vegatables with some good tips and tricks for common and uncommon vegatables. Ignore the knife advice and sharpening parts. It was catered to western style knives.

    Chicken butchery is easy and there are lots of videos online. I took a class for whole hog butchering. Best $200 I've spent. That's the only cooking class I've ever taken.
     
  6. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Ok thanks
     
  7. tweakz

    tweakz

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    The Craftsy knife skills class is great if you don't mind many emails afterward trying to sell you more classes (can probably be blocked). TBH: didn't learn anything from it, and suggest you can learn as much with more time digging. Thinking you've already learned everything about knife skills is a handicap. 
     
  8. dcarch

    dcarch

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    Unless you are working for a restaurant, there is no need whatsoever to aim for cutting fast with a knife.

    Learn the best way to cut food, not the fastest way. Unless you are a showoff. 

    dcarch
     
  9. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    I disagree. I'm busy and hungry, why spend more time on prep than necessary? I can get one component started, whatever takes longest, then move on to the next. You can't do that if it takes 10 minutes to dice an onion.
     
  10. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    ... Speed comes with experience... you do not "practice" being faster with a knife, that is a good way to cut yourself. Within 4 or 5 years your speed will increase exponentially, until then there is no reason for you to worry about how long it takes you to cut anything, unless you eat a lot of french onion soup. I also don't recommend cutting things piecemeal ie. cut onion, place in pan, cut garlic while onion is sweating. Cooking is always more of a joy when you've got your mise en place
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2014
  11. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    At the same, I know old people with slow, bad, unsafe knife skills. Time by itself is nothing. Focus on good habits every time you pick up a knife.
     
  12. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    @spoiledbroth within reason. Ex. I am roasting a chicken. I will do just what i need to get it in the oven before I start on side dishes.
     
  13. dcarch

    dcarch

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    Busy? Hungry? Use a food processor.

    In a typical meal on the average, recipes requiring lots of cutting still can be done without rushing. No one needs 10 minutes to cut an onion. two minutes may be. Why try to save 30 seconds and risk serious injuries?

    Learn the best way to bone a chicken (Jacques Pepin), not the fastest way to bone a chicken (Martin Yan)

    dcarch
     
  14. ordo

    ordo

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    There's a pleasure in cutting fast (and a necessity) and there's a pleasure in cutting slow. For a begginer, i'm with dcarch. It's like that advice to practice piano; First, play slow. Then slower. Then even slower. If your moves are ingrained in your muscular memory, fast will come by its own.
     
  15. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Ok thanks guys
     
  16. rick alan

    rick alan

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    One more thing.  There is a trick that all professional athletes use and it is called Mental Imaging.  In this case the trick is you see in your mind what you want the knife to do, and pretty soon it just starts doing it.  Go slow and slower as suggested, breaking down the motions till you got everything straight, and you are always "seeing" things like you want them to happen.  Then when you've got that down build up the speed gradually.

    Rick
     
  17. mrbushido

    mrbushido

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    Yes but is what knife skills that fit my blades the most so i can practise them slow
     
  18. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Just the guillotine-and-glide I'm sure you heard about.  And what you'd do for any knife, keeping it straight on the board, no twisting, so your edge doesn't get damaged.

    Rick
     
  19. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    Practice paring too, get a cheap if you are scared of using your petty or whatever and just take the edge off it abit. Look up some videos of how to peel potatoes and apply the skill to whatever kind of produce with a skin you can get cheaply. It's a pretty good skill to have. There are alot more skills you can practice with your knives but it's kind of impractical for you to buy 20 whole chickens and practice deboning them. Practicing the varous french cuts is a good way to develop alot of skill. Take the same potatoes once you are done peeling them and look up a video on how to Tournee -- you do not need a birds beak to do it, there's a few videos on youtube that show you how to use a spear point paring knife. And make sure you are always making the "bear claw" with the hand opposite to the knife when cutting things on the cutting board. Good luck! ;)
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2014
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  20. tweakz

    tweakz

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    Speed can reduce stiction, resistance, and deflection under certain circumstances. Practice speed with a cut resistant glove if there's a danger. 
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 28, 2015