Ever wonder...

kuan

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how some things were discovered? Like Mayonnaise for example. Was it deliberate or did someone stumble upon emulsification by accident? Did someone go... "hrm, let's see what happens when we drizzle oil into eggyolk?" How about Meringue? Did someone just figure they would beat the dickens out of sugar and eggwhites? Amazing isn't it? What's the next big culinary breakthrough? Please don't say foams :)

Kuan
 
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History of Mayo
Mayonnaise was invented in 1756 by the French chef of the Duc de Richelieu. After the Duc beat the British at Port Mahon, his chef created a victory feast that was to include a sauce made of cream and eggs. Realizing that there was no cream in the kitchen, the chef substituted olive oil for the cream and a new culinary creation was born. The chef named the new sauce "Mahonnaise" in honor of the Duc's victory.

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About the foam, I agree with both of you. Remember the thread?
 
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I always am amazed at how things come to be.

What about Chaud froid? and confit...to preserve foods?
 
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Hubbie always wonders about the first person to pick up an oyster, crack it open, and eat it!:D
 
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I wonder about some of the things that are poisonous if not prepared in particular ways, like taro root.
 
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CC:

Chaud-froid (lit.: hot-cold) came about when the Marshal of Luxembourg was late for a diner at the Chateau Montmorency in the mid 18th century, and was served cold chicken fricassé. He fell in love with the cold leftover and asked for it to be served again. It was called "refroidi" (cooled) but he didn't like the name, so he re-named it chaud-froid.
 
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Just my take on it but I always thought that someone must have seen an animal eating oysters and thought "hey, it hasn't killed him" and tried one. Hey! It coulda been that simple! :D

Jodi
 
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chaud-froid, that's the white decorating sauce that is used on turkeys and such right ?. Anyway the story I was told was that , The king's chef, I think it was Careme, anyway, was preparing a banquet and in the middle of the preparations the kitchen crew was called away to help fight a battle and when they got back the bechamel had set into a gel, so rather than heating everything up again, the chef served it cold and it was a hit.

Did you know that originally people ate the green tops of the potates, until they figured out that it was the root they were supposed to eat.

Dubarry, aka cauliflower garnish etc... was name after a royal mistress whose name happened to be Dubarry and she had an immense passion for cauliflower.

Parmentier, potato garnish came about the same way, some french guy (guess what his name was) loved potatoes so much, and i guess he at them at every meal that the name just stuck.

One thing I've always wondered is how people discovered that eggs were good eats.
 
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Hmmmm Kuan wonders what is next.

I will be heretic now but never mind :D

Cooking is not a science but an art. So I do not really think that new inventions as the examples you mentioned will appear.

What ever needed to be discovered was discovered I am afraid.
Tell me what new discovery we have had in cooking during the 20th centrury...Unless we talk about the foams ;)

Careme and all these French ( whether we like it or not) have said the last word... C'est fini!

:cool:
 
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Marmalady, I read a story in a cookbook years ago about the first man to eat a oyster. Can't remember which book, but I've always remembered the story 'cause I thought it was great! So, to your Hubbie, with my compliments....

A caveman was walking along the beach and spied a strange looking shell. As he picked it up to get a better look, the shell opened and pinched his finger. He jerked away, put the hurt finger in his mouth, and tasted something wonderful! So he found a rock, beat open the shell, and was the first human to ever eat an oyster. This must be the way it happen. No one would have been brave enough to be the first person to eat an oyster if they had seen it before they tasted it!

The Saucy Cajun :lol:
 
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The author of this book is obviously the same with the one who writtes the script for "Zena" ... LOL
 

kuan

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Some King probably made his food taster eat it first and waited to see if he fell over. :)

Kuan
 
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I don't think we can reinvent the wheel - I think we can learn to manipulate it a little better. I think the next big trend will be people finally learning how to eat locally and think globally, using sustainable production methods for produce, livestock and wildlife.
If we can't learn to maintain and support our food sources, and make people aware of shrinking supplies and limited diversity due to a lack of regard for our enivironment, there ain't gonna be anything left for the new century.

Just my two cents for today.

Monkey
p.s. in regards to the oyster - I always wondered the same thing about artichokes :)
 
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It's scary to think that Wal Mart has entered the supermarket arena and has already given Albertson's a run for their money.

By the same token, IBM has taken over many companies including the one for whom I work. Things just ain't the same anymore. Whoever invented homogenization ought to be brought before the firing squad.
 
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CoolJ,i noticed you`ve mentioned Antonin Careme,he was a dedicated and skilled chef.The problem was that he was not known for his tolerance:eek: Sounds like quite a few famous chefs!!:D Chefs like Brillat-Savarin, Careme,etc,had to improvise and work under conditions that we wouldn`t tolerate today.Leo
:chef:
 
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I am not so sure about shrinking supplies, Monkeymay. A recent study by the UN Food & Agriculture Organization concluded that "With lower population growth and the gradual attainment of medium to high food consumption levels in most countries, crop productivity will continue to outpace the overall growth rate in the demand for food"
 
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Fair enough, GSquared. I value the UN's opinion. We have a government here that pays farmers not to grow crops because there's too much. However, (and I know it's a loaded question), why are there people that still don't have enough to eat - both in my country and certainly on your continent? Like I said, I know it's a loaded question. Just throwing it out there.
Peace,
Monkey:)
 
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Monkeymay, I think that the largest famines of the last 10 years or so were the direct result not of inherent problems with food production, but of government policies and politics that interfered with the distribution of food aid. Our neigbour to the north, Zimbabwe, is a case in point- food aid is simply not reaching the vast majority of hungry people because of a corrupt and venal government. We live in an imperfect world......
 

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