Ever had a job with little to no standards?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by celbrise, Oct 12, 2018.

  1. celbrise

    celbrise

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    I've gone through 4 jobs in the past 2 months all of them with horrible standards.

    i am wondering if this is normal or what exactly in the world is going through some peoples minds?

    just an example one of these restaurants almost killed a customer with a nut allergy after i told the sous chef there are nuts in this dish which he then stated "we don't serve nuts in any of our dishes" then i pointed out the piece of almond ontop of the shrimp that was marinated in pesto which they used the almonds for. i literally refused to serve that customer and not make that dish. the first time in my career that i had to refuse to do my job due to lack of competence of a higher up.

    anyone else have had jobs like these before? i really can't fathom how i have gone through 4 in a row just like this. not are all like this but they have really bad standards when it comes to food handling/products in general that i was simply embarrassed as a cook to be working there. it wasn't the pay, people were mostly okay but the standards they had set was mind boggling
     
  2. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Interviews should be two way streets. I am always interviewing potential employers at least as hard, usually more so, than they are interviewing me. I always ask for a walk through of the work environment and a chance to observe a service in action. Talk is cheap. Anybody can do it. Fact finding needs to go deeper than a dining room sit down verbal exchange with an interviewer. Actions in a kitchen at work, speak volumes and reveal much insight. Becoming better informed will lend itself to making better choices about potential employers. Up your interview game.
     
  3. celbrise

    celbrise

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    true i do need to step my interview game up and start asking more often for walk throughs. thats never been an issue though usually they offer me a walk through. I should start to ask if i can view how they work as well for a few minutes.

    any other suggestions? i started doubting myself telling myself maybe i've gotten lazy but when i look at myself work i know im not lazy and people tell me im doing a good job and im a fast learner and all that. i just tell myself they are just saying that to encourage me/be nice though.
     
  4. iceman82

    iceman82

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    There is nothing wrong with asking to stage, if it isn't suggested in the interview. If you are told you will be called, then ask for it to be a working interview, meaning, you want to still have an opportunity to decline the job after working a shift. If you are greeted with opposition to this idea in any way, decline the job right then, otherwise, go check it out. When staging or in a working interview, ask the other employees questions, such as how long they have been there, do they like it, what is their favorite quality of the chef and/or sous chef / managers etc,...

    Remember, you are replacable, but so is your job. You are looking out for you first.

    I always look for good hours ( and by this I mean constants, so I ask how often would my schedule change from week to week ) , when in the first interview ask for a tour of the kitchen and check a couple of things for cleanliness - I always check drip trays under burners or grills and the drip tray under below the hood fan filters, and the bottom floor of reach in fridges. Obviously, if these things are done every day, it should be freaking sparkling to just a bit soiled, and ask them so you can compare. If they are lying, do not accept the job.

    I would also like to point out that in my twenty four years , I have had two different spans of time where I jumped ship like frogger getting to the next level. The first time it lasted for five months and three jobs, the second time it lasted for ten months and six jobs and eleven working interviews. This industry is littered with quano and freaks, you are just looking for somewhere to grow :)
     
    linecookliz and phaedrus like this.
  5. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    At my present gig the only standards are the ones I set. The owner doesn't seem to know or care. It's becoming painfully aware to me that it's sometimes better to bail on a job a little too early than a little too late.
     
    linecookliz likes this.
  6. Seoul Food

    Seoul Food

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    Good for you for seeing that these places aren't living up to your own set of standards. You should never have to compromise on things when it comes to safety and sanitation but make sure you aren't leaving places for philosophical differences. I would also be curious if these restaurants all had something in common like a similar type or style or were they all completely different venues?
     
  7. bier chef

    bier chef

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    That is such a great way of explaining a management position interview. I have turned down several jobs that wanted to hire me but I couldn't take faith in the employers. I love turning the table and to start interviewing cooks and servers during the interview too. It throws people off hard.
     
  8. Luked1281

    Luked1281

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    I think you simply need to research your job. Have any of your friends or acquaintances worked there? What's their TripAdvisor rating? What does the menu look like?
     
    linecookliz likes this.