European Jobs

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by culinarian247, Jan 15, 2003.

  1. culinarian247

    culinarian247

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    Does anyone know the process for a United States citizen acquiring a job over in the United Kingdom? How hard is it to get a job over there anyways?
     
  2. entremetier

    entremetier

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    HI!


    well first of all you will need a work permit to work
    in the the UK or any where else in Europe.


    the best way is to go over a online recruitment agency.
     
  3. rachel

    rachel

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    I would check with the British Consulate that is nearest to you as they can give you proper advice. It also depends on whether you want to work in a well payed official job or are just looking for experience.
     
  4. pinarello

    pinarello

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    You will need to be sponsered, try a big hotel chain, usually not the best jobs but its your foot in the door.
    Thats also how I did it, 4 years ago.....
     
  5. mike

    mike

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    the grass is always greener....we want to come over there to work !!!! after yove got your paperwork done check out www.caterer.com a uk publication with 100s jobs everyweek.
    If you want the quality end experience email me and ill give you the lowdown on whose hot..good luck.
    ps you do know it rains all the time here & we dont actually have
    a food culture ooops nor do you!!!!
    JOKING
    chow
     
  6. bripash

    bripash

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    well i have found it hard to get a work permit. if you do not live there i have been told it is almost impossible to get one. I was looking, and the recruiter i went through told me. The ends and out of it.
    If someone does find out tell me also
    :bounce:
     
  7. lamington

    lamington

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    Youth is definitely an advantage; you can (depending on nationality perhaps) get something like a working holiday visa if you are under 28 or so. There is quite useful info usually available from the website of the visa section of the British Embassy in each country.
     
  8. chefnrnnr

    chefnrnnr

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    I got a job in london very easily,when they asked if I had a work permit I said yes they never asked to see it.and if pressed I would have said my flat had been burglerd recently
     
  9. lamington

    lamington

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    Well, yes that is a solution of sorts. The down-side being that, should one be caught, the result for a foreigner is deportation and enduring hassles should one ever wish to enter the country again. Ehem.
     
  10. leo r.

    leo r.

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    The U.K. currently has an acute shortage of skilled hospitality employees.This,at present,runs into thousands of unfilled vacancies.As Mike suggested,if anyone is interested in working in Britain,log on to www.caterer.com
    I am puzzled as to why any skilled person should be refused work here.Our immigration laws surely can`t be that obstructive,can they?Hopefully,some government official will get something done to rectify the current absurd situation.
     
  11. lamington

    lamington

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    The official position in Australia, the EU, Canada, and I believe the USA, is that a position cannot be offered to a foreigner unless it can be demonstrated that the foreign applicant is better qualified than any local applicant. For my last position in the UK, my employer had to fill in 35 forms -- one for each other applicant -- stating why I (an Australian) was a better candidate.

    Of course, fiction and fantasy can be used in filling in the forms, and positions can be tailored in their description so as to minimise the number of other applicants... but basically unless the employer really wants the foreigner and knows how to work the system, then a local has to win.
     
  12. leo r.

    leo r.

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    Lamington,i`m sorry to hear that you had to put up with so much red tape.I have worked with a number of people from Australia,Tasmania and New Zealand,mostly chefs.
    This a derisory situation that some jobsworth/politican has created.
    If the U.K. does get the 2012 Olympics,it is going to be a right bodge-up.I don`t know where the **** does some pen pusher think that a sufficiently skilled workforce will come from.Britain is struggling to cope as it is!
    Maybe a UFO will land and sort the problem out.:D
     
  13. lamington

    lamington

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    I think there are two ways of viewing this... a large part of the electorate in any of the countries mentioned (or the EU in general) is not that happy with the idea of 'foreigners taking our jobs', and politicians are well aware of it. For those of us who work in industries that involve international movement, it of course seems unnecessary and ludicrous. We remain the minority though, and electorates are rarely sympathetic to such arguments. Note that the restriction on employment in Britain/EU pertains to non-EU citizens only. Free movement within the EU is fine, so London (if it were to get the Olympics) would be full of even more (un)lucky EU citizens welcoming the opportunity to travel and work.
     
  14. bripash

    bripash

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    as a us citizen. it is easy to find the job overseas. Like I said before it is hard to find someone to sponsor a visa. It is the sponsorship where i have the problem.
    b
    :bounce: