Eurest and chef knowledge test/market basket

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Joined Jul 23, 2021
Hi all-
I’m in the running for an Executive Chef position and have to do the above as the next steps. I found an old thread on this, but does anyone have current advice or ideas?
 
4,755
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Joined Aug 21, 2004
Stick to what you know and are comfortable with. Remember more is not always better. Many times in these situations, I see chefs spinning their wheels at the last minute looking for one more thing to put on the plate. A lot of times, less is more.
 
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Joined Oct 2, 2016
It doesn't hurt to ask what's in the basket. This will allow you to prepare for it. Either they will say it will be what there is in the fridge (with a little experience we know eight chances out of ten what they contain), or they will say the outline of the basket, or they say that it will be a surprise (which will be more complicated to manage). In my opinion it is not bad to pass this qoup of thread and to ask the question (it shows that you like to be organized and prepared for your work). At worst you get a refusal (and they are a bit of idiots). Make sure you keep your workstation clean and organized, it always looks good.
 
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Joined Dec 13, 2018
Do NOT try doing something you haven't executed well previously. Obviously, it might not be exactly the same dish but show your best. Don't shoot for something if you don't know it will impress. Besides, as great as the Compass group (Eurest...) is, they are desperate in a lot of places right now. Walk in confident and strut your stuff!
 
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Joined Dec 13, 2018
I'd suggest negotiating for 5-10 gs more if they send you an offer. It's never been a better market for our talents
 
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Joined May 5, 2010
I mentioned this in other thread of this nature. I've never understood the need for a mystery basket.
You're a Chef. Chef's work with numbers, communication skills, people, and management. Yes they work with food but it's the managerial skills they should be testing. Food is only a small part, and you wouldn't even be there if you didn't already know how to cook.
 

nicko

Founder of Cheftalk.com
Staff member
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Joined Oct 5, 2001
When I went on an interview for a large chain I was asked to prepare a menu. When I arrived to the restaurant to prepare the menu for the managers and executive chef the main ingredient I requested "Lamb" was missing. They said they couldn't get lamb in for me that day. It was nothing more than a test to see how I would react to something being changed. I updated my menu and moved on.

Personally I don't get the point of the mystery basket. If you are hiring a cook ask them to prepare their best and possibly one other item. This sounds old school to me.
 
4,755
1,010
Joined Aug 21, 2004
Personally I don't get the point of the mystery basket. If you are hiring a cook ask them to prepare their best and possibly one other item. This sounds old school to me.
If you go by my age...I am about as old school (or dinosaur) as you can get, and my work history only includes two cooking interviews... both for a cook position. I agree with chefross.

Stick to what you know. Keep it simple without being simplistic. Less is more many times. Make sure the courses flow together with a pairing logic and order to the sequencing.
 
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