EU attempts to internationally protect 41 products of origign

phatch

Moderator
Staff member
9,360
961
Joined Mar 29, 2002
http://www.sltrib.com/2003/Aug/08292...ness/87754.asp

I have mixed feelings about this effort.

1st, On the list of 41 items, I didn't find one name that hasn't been in use for cenutries in more than one country without dispute, but I'm not all knowing on the topic. What this means to me is that the chance for protected name status is past. Legally, this is called easement. While you have rights when you create something, if you allow those rights to be used by others and don't attempt to enfore your rights, the others have gained the use of those rights.

2nd, I believe these products to be generally more culinarily interesting than their counterpart clones (at this time) and would like to see these products more readily available. The EU's effort would support this desire.

3rd. The trademark issue is horribly muddied by international differences. In the end, my opinion is that these terms are in the public domain and trademark protection doesn't apply. This mean's Canada's Parma Ham is out of luck along with the fine hams of Parma. I think they are both creating hams in the style of Parma, but that one product is superior and I prefer it.

My solution. These items would be better served by forming a consortium for quality, much as with Balsamic Vinegars. That stamp is your marketing power and sign of quality to consumer. Ideally, in my opinion, the consortium would recognize similar products of quality from around the world. This would aid the in the growth, recognition and quality of food worldwide. But I don't mind if these consortiums choose to just support local industries.

I do believe that in many cases technique and quality control can lead to superior products of the type being produced in places outside of the original region. We're not seeing that right now, but such a move to "protect" would restrain the growth and development of fine foods, where a private consortium mark of quality would spark more fine food more widely available.

In my opinion.

Phil
 
1,310
15
Joined Dec 4, 2001
I too have mixed feelings about this but I'm curious. The EU is a political body and as we all know, politics is never simple and straightforward.
If any country outside Europe goes along with this (and I'd be surprised if any did) there has to be some quid pro quo. I wonder what that would be?
Still, the French managed to convince most wine producing countries to call their champaign "sparkling wine" because champaign is unique to that region of France. Wine producers here in California said, no, we use champaign grapes and we will call our wine champaign. And so they do.
This would have to be completely voluntary because it is unenforcable. If we were talking about one item (like champaign for instance) it might be managable. With 600 products, I don't think that many producers world wide would line up behind this effort.

Jock
 

phatch

Moderator
Staff member
9,360
961
Joined Mar 29, 2002
The original article did mention that Scotch would be a product of origin and Bourbon already is in the US.

Phili
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom