Equilibrium Brining Question

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by todd o, Mar 15, 2017.

  1. todd o

    todd o

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    Has anyone ever used their equilibrium brining solution as a braising liquid, after your meat is infused?
     
  2. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    No.

    I asked this a couple of years ago and was told the end product would be too salty (and any spices would become too pronounced).

    So just dumped it and have continued to do so.

    mimi
     
  3. todd o

    todd o

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    Thank you Mimi, I'm wondering if the person who answered your question understood equilibrium brining, as when the meat is fully infused, the meat and the remain brine will have equalized their salinity, so using the brine as a braising liquid shouldn't make anything saltier.
    I'm thinking about equilibrium brining a large beef knuckle roast for French dip sandwiches and I'd like to use the leftover (brining/braising) liquid as a jus, after braising.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
  4. chefross

    chefross

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    Todd...welcome to ChefTalk.

    I love how the outside world finds new and interesting words for things that have been around for a long time.

    Brining meat is not rocket science. The idea here is to make your end product more juicy and flavorful.

    The one example I can think of which would answer both yours and Mimi's question would be corned beef.

    In mid February I make a salt brine with pickling spice. I bring it to a simmer to dissolve all the salt then allow it to cool. I place the brisket in a large plastic bus tub, fill it with the brine, cover it with plastic and a plate to weigh the meat down.

    This stays in the fridge until March 17th.   So a month in the brine. Take it out and rinse it then slow simmer in fresh water.

    The meat accepts the saltiness of the  brine you make.

    If you add too much salt, the effects will be too salty....you can control the brine yourself so that it is not too salty.

    If the brine is too salty, anything you cook in that brine will also be to salty. You could add only a small amount of the brine in addition to fresh water when cooking something.

    I hope this helps
     
  5. todd o

    todd o

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    Thank you, Chefross... Good thought about diluting it, if it's too salty! I had considered heating and sampling the brine, before using it as a braising liquid. Thanks, again!
     
  6. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Thanks Chef.

    You explained that way better than the person who answered my question way back when.

    I got a bunch of % 's and some algebra but never really understood till you posted it in plain English.

    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

    mimi
     
  7. french fries

    french fries

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    While braising, your braising liquid will reduce and the concentration in salt will increase.