Eg Long Term Storage

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by texastalking, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. texastalking

    texastalking

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    A coworker insisted that his family has boiled eggs for years (can't recall; possibly 15 minutes) which turned them green in color but allowed them to be kept as long as desired; possibly never spoiled.  I am certain it is true because he is quite honest.

    Does anyone know the time required?

    Another forum had a commnet that her inlaws normally ate Easter eggs after a full year with room temprature strage.

    Ed  
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 14, 2011
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    They're pushing their luck with food poisoning.

    The quality of dried powdered eggs is pretty good now and is what I would work with for a non-refrigerated egg product. You'll need to hydrate and cook it.

    There are shelf-stable MRE egg dishes as well, but not something a home cook can craft and package.

    If you want to eat it with no prep in the field, I think MRE is the only safe option.
     
  3. butzy

    butzy

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    We used to make salted eggs, where the eggs are kept in a brine solution till you needed them. You would then boil them for 10 mnutes or so. But these eggs had to be used as a condiment, as they were obviously very salted (we ate them as part of a rijsttafel).

    I've also heard that you could keep the eggs covered in salt or sand or anything, which would make the eggs last longer (again, unboiled). This apparently works by preventing the gas exchange between the egg and the air (via the poreus shell). I have never tried this though.

    I suppose if you hard boil an egg and leave it in the shell, you could keep it for quite a while, but months ????
     
  4. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    An old time technique was to dip the eggs into liquid glass, which supposedly accomplishes the same thing.

    But the question is, how long is long? Raw eggs, even unrefrigerated, last a fairly long time. A matter of weeks, at any rate. Certainly long enough for any reasonable camping trip. With camping the problem isn't safety and quality, it's transportation. Keeping them whole and unbroken is the trick.

    As to the others, lots of luck. Anyone who eats a cooked, unrefrigerated egg that old is courting danger at the very least.
     
  5. trooper

    trooper

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    I can't recall the name of it - but there is some kind of rotten duck egg that's popular as street-vendor food - Maybe in Asia, somewhere? I'm sure someone here knows what I'm talking about.

    It doesn't seem to me that an egg would stay "fresh" - but more likely it would be pickled, fermented or brined (Meaning not fresh)

    So is the question how to store eggs in native form for a long period - or just how to preserve eggs, regardless of what their flavor profile/condition will be?
     
  6. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    trooper likes this.
  7. trooper

    trooper

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    Thanks, Chef - I was thinking of the Balut - but had the Century Egg in my mind for some reason. Thanks for the reply!
     
  8. homemadecook

    homemadecook

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    I have tasted the balut. From the look, it seems it is really disgusting! You try to imagine a one day old chicken that is kinda hairy and wet. The is the picture of the balut but, what is TT is referring is maybe the century egg? Maybe because as I recall the one the OP mentioned is that, it is green in color. Century egg has a greenish color so, maybe that is what the OP is referring. :D
     
  9. breadmaker man

    breadmaker man

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    I'm normally pretty adventurous when it comes to new foods but that sounds utterly repulsive. Yuck!
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2011
  10. gonefishin

    gonefishin

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          Just because a person is honest, does not mean they are also well informed.

        Dan
     
  11. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Uhhh, "1000 year eggs" are made by treating the eggs with a mixture of horse urine, straw, and some other secret ingredients. If memory serves me, they are still liquid when treated and must be hard boiled before cracking open the shell.  This seems to be a very common preservation technique throughout Asia. 

    Salted duck eggs are another story.

    Balut is a true Phillipine dish

    "It used to be" popular in certain parts of Europe to have trays of h.b. eggs complete with a shaker of salt in bars as snack food.  These were never refrigerated, but they also never stayed very long on the table either. Common practice was for two guys to see who could crack the other guys's egg without cracking his--kinda like the N.American wishbone thing.
     
  12. kuldeep

    kuldeep

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    I  also know.tell me