effect of alkaline water on food preparation?

25
10
Joined May 30, 2016
It has just come to my attention that my tap water is VERY alkaline - pH 9.6. Now, the mineral content is low, and the water tastes fine (in fact lowering the mineral content is largely how the water gets to be so alkaline -- liming is a standard strategy for removing minerals). But I was wondering what very alkaline water does to food. The alkalinity is not severe, such that it isn't well buffered, in the sense that it doesn't take much acid to neutralize the water, but still ...

I know that making eggs alkaline interferes with foaming, which is why cream of tartar is added to help acidify and improve whipping.
I believe bread yeast is happiest in slightly acidic conditions.
I've seen it suggested that fish be cooked in alkaline water to reduce the "fishy" taste.
Acidic water is said to compromise taste of vegetables boiled in it.

What else ought to be known?
 
694
258
Joined Sep 17, 2018
It has just come to my attention that my tap water is VERY alkaline - pH 9.6. Now, the mineral content is low, and the water tastes fine (in fact lowering the mineral content is largely how the water gets to be so alkaline -- liming is a standard strategy for removing minerals). But I was wondering what very alkaline water does to food. The alkalinity is not severe, such that it isn't well buffered, in the sense that it doesn't take much acid to neutralize the water, but still ...

I know that making eggs alkaline interferes with foaming, which is why cream of tartar is added to help acidify and improve whipping.
I believe bread yeast is happiest in slightly acidic conditions.
I've seen it suggested that fish be cooked in alkaline water to reduce the "fishy" taste.
Acidic water is said to compromise taste of vegetables boiled in it.

What else ought to be known?
I don't really think a water in the 9's is going to make that much of a difference. I guess it would depend on what you are cooking in it, for how long and how much water but I can't see it having massive negative or positive results on a regular scale one way or another. There are plenty of foods out there with higher levels.
 
25
10
Joined May 30, 2016
Well, it's pretty clear that similarly acidic water, say pH 3 or so, will curdle milk. Not smart to mix water of that acidity with milk. Acids are also good meat tenderizers. I think acidifying scrambled eggs makes them creamier. One might expect similarly alkaline water to have some effects.

I'm aware that vegetables can be slightly alkaline, but not 9-10. Tofu, I believe, can reach 9 or so. What foods were you thinking of?
 
694
258
Joined Sep 17, 2018
Well, it's pretty clear that similarly acidic water, say pH 3 or so, will curdle milk. Not smart to mix water of that acidity with milk. Acids are also good meat tenderizers. I think acidifying scrambled eggs makes them creamier. One might expect similarly alkaline water to have some effects.

I'm aware that vegetables can be slightly alkaline, but not 9-10. Tofu, I believe, can reach 9 or so. What foods were you thinking of?
Well a ph of 3 is a larger jump from neutral than an increase to the 9's, even rain water is around 5 on the ph scale, and as most people would cook with water from a tap I'm not sure where you would get water that is so acidic to cook with. I believe generally higher alkalinity deals with minerals and absorption or accumulation while lower ph (higher acidity) would obviously be more caustic.

Here are some foods:

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/0e/a5/36/0ea5363c461cf4d16819a60b02701e54.jpg
 
25
10
Joined May 30, 2016
Thanks for the link to pH levels in foods. But it's a pretty screwy table. Lemons and limes are pH 10? Grapes and berries are pH 9? "Worry", "overwork", and "lack of sleep" have pH values? Someone was smokin' somethin' when they made that list.

That being said, probably true that pH of 9.6 isn't going to do much to food. I've been using it for decades, and never suspected a problem caused by my tap water.
 
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694
258
Joined Sep 17, 2018
I honestly didn't look too closely at the numbers, just glanced at the values after I googled it, there were a bunch more. As far as I know citrus has a low ph (acidic) so not sure why that would be 10.
 
25
10
Joined May 30, 2016
I honestly didn't look too closely at the numbers, just glanced at the values after I googled it, there were a bunch more. As far as I know citrus has a low ph (acidic) so not sure why that would be 10.
Oh yes, at least lemon juice is pH about 2, so that list is nutso. But I didn't ever succeed in finding a nice table of pH of veggies. If you can find a more sensible one, I'd like to see it.
 

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