edible tasty weed

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by powderdog, Jul 2, 2012.

  1. powderdog

    powderdog

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    I went on the internet to identify a weed that has taken over my garden and found that I have been missing a really great wild vegetable, Purslane.  Chefs in NY are paying $7 / lb. for the stuff.  Google for it and you can find out all about it and the great health benefits from it.  Here is how I prepared it last night:

    bunch of brocoli

    fist full of purslane

    half a large hot dried chili

    3 cloves garlic

    olive oil

    salt

    Separate the brocoli florets from the stems into bite size and slice the stems bite size.  Put the stem pieces in the bottom of a sauce pan and the florets on top of the stems.  With just enough water to come to the top of the layer of florets, bring to boil, lower heat to rapid simmer for 5 minutes from the time it starts to boil.  Quickly remove from heat, drain and run cold water over the brocoli.  Drain and set aside keeping warm.

    Crumble the dried chili and saute it in enough olive oil to cover it for 5 - 10 minutes.

    Meanwhile, remove the roots, if any are attached, from the purslane and chop it into pieces 2 or 3 inches long.  (This isn't rocket science, folks.)

    When the chili has simmered long enough to spice up the olive oil, drain it through a strainer and discard the chili.

    Mince the garlic and add it to the olive oil and simmer long enough to infuse the olive oil but not brown the garlic.

    Toss in the purslane, stir it up a bit and simmer about a minute, then toss in the brocoli, sprinkle with salt, stir to coat the brocoli and serve.

    I was wondering how to get rid of it and now I'm afraid I won't have enough of it.  The flavor is fairly mild and I can't imagine anyone not liking it.  It seems that they eat it everywhere in the world except the US !!!
     
  2. zoebisch

    zoebisch

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    I think the muscilagenous quality might be a turn off to some. For those who haven't had it, it's got that Okra quality.  I like it snipped raw in salads.  It readily reseeds and it's substrate growth habit makes it good for something interspersed with other greens.  You can buy improved varieties online too. 
     
  3. ishbel

    ishbel

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    I like to add it to a tomato, cucumber and feta salad.  Also to add it to a courgette soup along with a lemon juice and zest.

    It is often an ingredient in dishes from Turkey and other near eastern countries.
     
  4. wildchef

    wildchef

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    We add purslane to potato salad, it gives a nice crunch. We also add it to salsa.
     
  5. crabapple

    crabapple

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    Clover,Alfalfa,rose hips,aspen,pine,Barberry,Beech,Bamboo,Cactus,cattail,chickweed,chicory,dandelion,dock,duck potato,dwarf Sumac.

    Are just a few of the things in the wild that will not poison you, but are good for you.
     
  6. maryb

    maryb

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    A common "weed" is stinging nettle. Very tasty when cooked, almost like spinach.
     
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  7. teamfat

    teamfat

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    I remember way back in Dowagiac getting a bowl of vinegar mixed with water, possibly with a bit of sugar added, from my mom and going out in the back yard. We'd pick dandelion leaves, dip them in the vinegar and eat.

    A few years back I was surprised to see bunches of dandelion greens for sale at a local market.

    Wonder if the dandelion in vinegar is what set the stage for my love of pickles over sweets?

    mjb.
     
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  8. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    @MaryB  stinging nettle is a good one for sure it not only makes a great spinach dish it can also be used as a refreshing tea on a hike. They are best when picked young.
     
  9. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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  10. everydaygourmet

    everydaygourmet

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    Grew up in the Western NY/Southern Ontario area, had this delicious stuff all over. Prepared it sauteed with dandelion greens or rapini as a side for steak. Used to eat it alone sauteed with a lot of black pepper and red wine vinegar as a side, it also pickles well, cold process.

    Cheers!

    EDG