Dry Aging

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by docsmith, Dec 29, 2009.

  1. docsmith

    docsmith

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    Last weekend I decided to have fun and cooked a roast I dry aged myself, which was quite excellent and very well cooked if I do say so myself.

    Being roasts are still pretty cheap after xmas I purchased another rib roast (boneless, the price for bone in and out was the same er lb :rolleyes:) and have it currently dry aging in my extra refrigerator.

    Now for the questions to the experts.

    1. Is dry aging really worth it? I'd test it with two roasts but my family isn't that big ;)

    2. For a 10 lb roast how long should I age? The last one I did was 7lbs and I did 3 days.
     
  2. gonefishin

    gonefishin

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    Hi DocSmith :) I can't say that I've ever dry aged my own meat. I wonder if dry aging at home may be worth it, I'll have to look into it.

    I have bought dry aged meat before and when properly done...it can be delicious. The beef can develop a nice deep complex flavor.

    I remember my wife and I bought several strip steaks for a taste comparison. One choice, one dry aged, one prime and one grass fed. We didn't do this to see if there was any differences, because we know there is. But we did it to taste these differences we knew existed side by side. We cooked the steaks on a gas grill to the same doneness and lightly salted after the rest.

    A nice dry aging really develops some nice flavors in my book...and if it's not too much trouble? I'd say it's definitely worth it! Coincidently I did stop by David Burkes yesterday, but I just got the Kobe beef appetizer and not one of their dry aged monsters:p

    I'd like to hear what you find out...please report back :)

    dan
     
  3. duckfat

    duckfat

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    It's a pain to dry age meat at home in your fridge. Dry aged meat really needs to hang and is not covered. That's not to say you can't improve meat quality in your fridge but it's a lot easier to wet age a whole sub-primal in a cryovac at home than attempting to dry age.
    This should only be tried by those with a large enough fridge and on a whole prime rib or whole NY strip unless you have a band saw to cut Porterhouses and T-bones from a sub-primal. I can fit a strip loin in my fridge but a 14# bone in prime rib is pretty difficult.
    How can any one go to David Burkes and not get a dry aged Porterhouse????
    You must have a lot more restraint than I do! :lol:
     
  4. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    I wonder. It's cool enough in my garage, maybe too cool. I could find a spot where it's like 40F and hang it there maybe.

    Hmm...
     
  5. docsmith

    docsmith

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    Ah good link, it answered the one question I had on the whole deal which was since I can't hang it, what to do with the run off (towels).

    Since this looks like something not often done, I'll report back how it goes. Perhaps when I move to a bigger place I'll rig up a hanging meat locker :thumb:
     
  6. gnnairda

    gnnairda

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    could you dry age it when its frozen? that could be one use the harsh winters in my city used for :rolleyes:
     
  7. dillonsmimi

    dillonsmimi

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    The whole point to dry aging is to remove body fluids by dehydration. I guess you could freezer burn it.
     
  8. gnnairda

    gnnairda

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  9. duckfat

    duckfat

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    If you have a secondary fridge that will fit a half sheet pan I would suggest putting the beef on a wire rack. If you have fridge with coated wire racks you could set the beef right on the rack and put the pan underneath as a drip pan. With dry aging what you really want is air circulation all the way around so the sub-primal dries evenly.


    "For a 10 lb roast how long should I age? The last one I did was 7lbs and I did 3 days"


    Your not going to dry age meat in three days. Again that doesn't mean you can't or shouldn't do it. I think it helps to get some of the blood out but that's all your going to do in a few days. Think more along the lines of three weeks.
    Is it worth it? IMO not really. You just can't get the same results as a butcher can with proper ageing techniques. This is why restaurants that dry age meat have special rooms or coolers for dry ageing.
    Have you ever tried wet ageing? Remember aging is ONLY for whole sub-primals. Next time try buying a whole prime rib leave it right in the cryovac for 4-6 weeks. It's a lot easier to get solid results at home this way. ;)
     
  10. duckfat

    duckfat

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    No. The meat needs to release moisture to dry age. That's not possible with frozen flesh.
     
  11. dillonsmimi

    dillonsmimi

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    Pete...great site. Answers a lot of questions I had been pondering. All in one place. Looks like a great vendor, also.
     
  12. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    Doc. I have been in ageing rooms in some great steakhouses, Old Homestead, Peter Luger, The Palm and I can tell you there is a huge difference. The blacker and hairier the better(naturally done under controlled temps and humidities. Most of them I have seen also use Ultra Violet light or the trade name( accu-ray) which stops the bad bacteria. Its like eaten a piece of deep flavored heaven. After age roatation is done they cryovac to stop aging.:chef:
     
  13. gonefishin

    gonefishin

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    LOL :lol:

    My buddy and I fins ourselves starting out at David Burkes. This time we got the Kobe beef sashimi and then went to another place to get some bluefin sashimi and some rolls. One of the other places we were going to go was reservation only (my fault)...so we ended with some tacos, mine were a simple steak, onion and cilantro. As usual :)


    I think I'll leave the dry aging to others.

    thanks,
    dan
     
  14. docsmith

    docsmith

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    Well the follow up.

    I dry aged for 4 days and it pulled quite a bit of moisture from the roast. I might not be a butcher, but my guess is dry aging has a point of diminishing returns. From what I saw I'd say that two weeks is perhaps where 85% of the aging happens, just a guess but an educated one.

    Was it better than just cooking? Who knows as it is I have a HUGE slab of left overs, and without a side by side blind taste test I'd never be able to know for sure.

    As for the cooking, it was perfectly medium rare and idiot simple. I have now ruined my prime rib eating out experience unless its perfectly done, being its not exactly difficult.

    So that leave me with two questions for the experts.

    1 - What do I do with the fat? I had a large chunk of nicely seasoned quite tasty beef fat which there HAS to be some culinary use for.

    2 - What do I do with 5 lbs of 'choice' rib roast? The best way to reheat or other applications. Odds are I will just eat it cold, and while it would make incredible sandwiches I gained 5 lbs over xmas and am watching the carbs.
     
  15. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Doc,

    So glad the standing rib was outstanding.

    Yes. You have. And whose fault is that?

    Can I play too?

    You could try rendering some, seasoning and all, and using it for sauteeing potatoes. The way to render is to cube it and put it in a pan with a little water, and simmer the water off. The water gets the fat to start melting instead of browning, then as it melts, the fat provides it's own liquid. Meanwhile the water evaporates. Work at a fairly low temp (med-low probably), you don't want to fry the fat, you want to melt it. Don't hurry the process.

    Once it's rendered, strain the fat through a fine sieve to get rid of any "cracklings" (which you can save and use for seasoning green beans or something).

    Anyway, try a test batch first. If it doesn't render (and as I recall the top fat off the rib doesn't render particularly well) you can cube it, use the cubed fat in the sautes as a flavoring agent, and pull them out before serving.

    Survey says, A number 1 purpose for lefotver rib: Cut to bite-size cubes (aka medium dice) and use it for chili and "curry." Outstanding for the purpose.

    You've already got visions of high-carb sandwiches dancing in your head so I won't add to that. Considering your avoiding carbs it would be cruel to say something like "Philly mushroom, pepper, onion cheese steak," wouldn't it?

    Do a straight "fajitas." Do plays on fajitas, for instance including mushrooms and a reducing some red wine, madeira, cognac or whatever. Basically, very close to the Philly idea but without the roll.

    Stroganoff. Cut it thin, and very gently, barely warm it. Do the other stuff -- mushrooms, onions, "sauce," etc., -- in separate pans and assemble it at the last minute so as not to overcook the beef. The rarer the better for stroganoff.

    5 lbs? You ought to get at least two meals out of that -- unless you're sharing.

    BDL
     
  16. docsmith

    docsmith

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    Oh that Stroganoff sounds like an excellent idea. My mother used to make it and in true Irish fashion the meat was so over cooked you thought she put in beef jerky as the final ingredient.

    One of lifes truism is Irish women know only well done and leather as 'done'.

    Shame because she is an excellent cook in everything besides meat.

    As for sharing, well I have this wife who likes to eat and a 2 year old daughter who ate 1/2 a slice last night with blue cheese. Thats daddy's girl.

    Thanks for the ideas they all sound interesting.
     
  17. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Considering how much better life is with a wife and daughter in it -- they don't really eat that much.

    Time to start saving for your daughter's diamond stud earrings.

    BDL
     
  18. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    Doc try this slice the roast into 1/4 inch slices bread with seasoned flour egg and panko crumbs, saute and serve with a warm Horseradish Cream Sauce made with either a Bechamel or heavy cream base if you like. I sell a lot of this.
    :chef:The fat can be used for a savory mix for yoir homemade sausage or wurst. Or real mince pie.
     
  19. docsmith

    docsmith

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    Ohhh now that sounds interesting and different. Sounds like a rich mans version of country fried steak :thumb: