Dough Sheeter belts, Vinyl VS Canvas?

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Joined Dec 27, 2021
I currently work on a tiny Rondo STM513 that needs new belts soon. I am seeing both canvas and vinyl options. I've always only worked on canvas, and while I like it, it does get inherantly grimy over time. I am curious about the vinyl option but can't find any reviews. Has anyone worked on both that has any insight? Most of what we do on it is cookie dough and pie dough, so lots of buttery goodness!
 

chefpeon

Kitchen Dork
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Joined Jun 15, 2006
I've never used a sheeter with vinyl belts, so take my words with a grain of salt. But what I know about vinyl is that it can get brittle over time and would probably be more prone to splits and cuts. Canvas is strong, doesn't get brittle, and the flour used embeds itself into the canvas, making it non-stick. I can cut my dough directly on the canvas without worrying about damage to the canvas either. I'd actually need to see a vinyl belt for myself to make a final assessment, but truly I think if I were in the market for a sheeter and I had a choice, I'd stick with canvas because I know it's reliable.
 
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Joined Oct 10, 2005
Canvas does get grimy over time, and “skid marks” from chocolate/ cookie doughs are hard to get out. If you’re only doing doughs like pie or puff don’t bother with vinyl, it’s not worth the extra cost

I was trained never, ever, ever to cut dough on a canvas belt be it with cutters, wheels, or gawd forbid, a knife. Mind you, at those places the belts were changed and laundered twice a year. This is not possible with newer, tabletop Rondos you pretty much have to take the tables off to change the belts.

Vinyl works great with doughs with high fat content, sweet doughs, and cookie doughs, you can wipe them down easy enough. Canvas will absorb fats and will eventually go rancid. Vinyl belts are robust enough to cut on with roller cutters or hand stamping, but will cut/scar easy with sharp knives. Vinyl is pretty much standard on larger machines that are used for croissant/ danish production. They don’t really brittle over time, but will start to delaminate at the seam— however this happens over a 10-15 yr period.

Hope this helps
 

chefpeon

Kitchen Dork
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Joined Jun 15, 2006
I was trained never, ever, ever to cut dough on a canvas belt be it with cutters, wheels, or gawd forbid, a knife. Mind you, at those places the belts were changed and laundered twice a year. This is not possible with newer, tabletop Rondos you pretty much have to take the tables off to change the belts.
I was too. But I did it anyway, because time, and there never seemed enough of it. I must say, with all that abuse, the canvas held up pretty well.
 
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Joined Dec 27, 2021
Canvas does get grimy over time, and “skid marks” from chocolate/ cookie doughs are hard to get out. If you’re only doing doughs like pie or puff don’t bother with vinyl, it’s not worth the extra cost

I was trained never, ever, ever to cut dough on a canvas belt be it with cutters, wheels, or gawd forbid, a knife. Mind you, at those places the belts were changed and laundered twice a year. This is not possible with newer, tabletop Rondos you pretty much have to take the tables off to change the belts.

Vinyl works great with doughs with high fat content, sweet doughs, and cookie doughs, you can wipe them down easy enough. Canvas will absorb fats and will eventually go rancid. Vinyl belts are robust enough to cut on with roller cutters or hand stamping, but will cut/scar easy with sharp knives. Vinyl is pretty much standard on larger machines that are used for croissant/ danish production. They don’t really brittle over time, but will start to delaminate at the seam— however this happens over a 10-15 yr period.

Hope this helps
Yes! Same here, Never cut, don't even look at the canvas with a knife in your hand. Hahaha. I have figured out how to remove the belts on this one, albeit a giant pain, it IS possible. I don't mind having to wash a couple times a year or more, but we're looking at double the cost for canvas vs vinyl. The owner is for canvas if canvas is best, but not opposed to vinyl either. I just wasn't sure about the life of vinyl. If we're saving half, but will need to replace in 2 years vs 15, it's not worth it at all. We do use a lot of high fat doughs on it, so I'm leaning toward vinyl just for cleanings sake.

Thank you so much for the input! I haven't heard or read anything about how a vinyl one works with different types of dough so I was more skeptical of how much it will stick,if we'll have more issues with the transfer between belts, etc... Big help!!
 
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Joined Dec 27, 2021
I was too. But I did it anyway, because time, and there never seemed enough of it. I must say, with all that abuse, the canvas held up pretty well.
The belts I'm on are 21 years old, and really - for that age, they're in great shape. It really is incredible how long they can last!
 

chefpeon

Kitchen Dork
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Joined Jun 15, 2006
The belts I'm on are 21 years old, and really - for that age, they're in great shape. It really is incredible how long they can last!
I will clarify when I said "cut" I meant only with cookie cutters and bench scrapers.....never a knife. I ain't that crazy.
 
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