dough climbing out of bowl

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10
Joined Aug 27, 2001
Not always, but frequently enough to be annoying, when I am kneading dough in my standing mixer it climbs right out of the bowl...doesn't get caught around the dough hook and beat itself against the walls. Am I doing something wrong? Eventually I can persuade it to act appropriately but I've done it other times without this problem.

Thanks.
 
13
10
Joined Aug 27, 2001
It does it whether or not I start slow and work my way up to medium or medium high or if I just crank it...weirdly enough, between the time it took me to post my question and get back to the dough, when I turned on the mixer this time it behaved appropriately.....maybe it just needs to rest in between the "come together with the paddle" stage and the "whipping with dough hook" stage.
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
The next problem I could see is the amount of dough in your mixer. What's the capacity of your bowl? If you have a Kitchenaid Mixer with 4-1/2 Quart Stainless Steel Bowl, you shouldn't put in much more than 6 1/2 cups to 7 cups of flour.
 
1,640
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
I think Kimmie is right. Remember low means nothing because each mixer (even the same brands) mix at different speeds. Your kitchen aids medium could be much faster than my kitchen aids medium. Gears strip over time.

Otherwise your dough is too tight. That happens from mixing too fast or having too much flour so it's a tough dough. Doughs do climb up the hook.....another factor could be the bowl or mixer your using....if the bowl isn't deep enough so when the dough climbs the hook while kneading it falls out because your bowl is high enough? But that isn't going to happen with a kitchen aid....

Too much dough...I think won't bring it out of the bowl. It stops or slows down your hook and burns out motors instead.
 
13
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Joined Aug 27, 2001
Would it make sense that after resting for a few minutes (10 or so) it didn't do that because it had relaxed enough?
 
1,640
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
yes, that makes perfect sense. The dough loosens up when the glutin relaxes. Slower mixing should help. Are you putting all your flour in at once? don't.
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Oh right, I don't either. Start with half your flour and end with the 2nd half after a couple minutes of mixing.

Thanks Wendy.
 
1,640
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
Part of the art of making bread involves knowing when to add and when not to add anymore flour. It's not uncommon to need less then what a recipe calls for or more then it calls for. You only add enough flour so the dough clears the bowl (for most breads). Over mixing and under mixing also heat up some doughs and change how they handle flour. It can all get rather technical, to say the least.

But if you have the patients to experiment abit watch how much flour your adding closely. For instance for 1 loaf of bread (a really small batch) could need almost a 1/2 c. less flour than the recipe calls for. Moist doughs are better tasting loafs then drier doughs, so you don't want to add any more flour than necessary. The whole item can go from a so-so yeast product to a great one with the right amount of flour. Breads are not like other baked goods in this regard, they are about feel and getting ther right texture.


Just some food for thought....
 

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