Double fried chicken?

7,676
845
Joined Apr 3, 2008
Do you think here is any merit to double frying chicken for extra crispyness? Like how we double fry French fries? Has anyone done it this way? I’m making gluten free fried chicken this weekend and was considering doing a double fry but not sure how to.
 
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Joined Aug 26, 2016
Seriously...if the chicken isn't crisp when it comes out of the grease, then something is wrong. I'd go with "no". Fry it as usual.

If you're looking for extra crispiness, add some cornstarch to your dredge.
 
402
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Joined Apr 25, 2017
I've seen and tried a number of techniques over the years, but never double frying.

Two things I have tried and like are: whipping eggs whites to between foamy and soft peak for the wet dip, and adding baking powder to the dry portion.

And don't forget to dry the chicken before dipping.
 
804
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Joined Sep 17, 2018
Is there a reason you won't be able to serve it straight from frying? I'm not really sure what the advantage of frying chicken and then frying it again later would be. As for fresh french fries, that is usually from a raw state with no coating and to be honest, putting any theories and science aside we simply par fried the fries so we could grab portions later and cook them to order without them being browned from oxidation.
 
7,676
845
Joined Apr 3, 2008
I've seen and tried a number of techniques over the years, but never double frying.

Two things I have tried and like are: whipping eggs whites to between foamy and soft peak for the wet dip, and adding baking powder to the dry portion.

And don't forget to dry the chicken before dipping.
I’ll have to try that egg white trick!
 
5,716
578
Joined Sep 5, 2008
I just made double fried chicken yesterday for Korean Fried Chicken (https://mykoreankitchen.com/korean-fried-chicken/). In the recipe she states:

Start adding the battered chicken carefully and fry them until they cook (between 3 to 5 mins, depending on the size of chicken). (...) Take out the done chicken and place them onto some kitchen paper while frying the remaining chicken pieces. Once the first set of deep frying is completed, quickly scoop out any floating debris from the oil using a skimmer. Then deep fry the chicken again when the oil temperature reaches 175 C / 347 F (or boiling). Fry them until the batter is golden and crisp. (The second time frying is shorter than the first time, 2 to 3 mins) Set aside.


Since I had pieces from two whole chickens to fry, and only a small fryer, this allowed me to do the first frying before the guests showed up, and the quick second frying just as we were ready to eat.

It really is the same idea as with French Fries: first a long fry to cook through, then a quick fry to order to reheat and color.
 
7,676
845
Joined Apr 3, 2008
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I just made double fried chicken yesterday for Korean Fried Chicken (https://mykoreankitchen.com/korean-fried-chicken/). In the recipe she states:

Start adding the battered chicken carefully and fry them until they cook (between 3 to 5 mins, depending on the size of chicken). (...) Take out the done chicken and place them onto some kitchen paper while frying the remaining chicken pieces. Once the first set of deep frying is completed, quickly scoop out any floating debris from the oil using a skimmer. Then deep fry the chicken again when the oil temperature reaches 175 C / 347 F (or boiling). Fry them until the batter is golden and crisp. (The second time frying is shorter than the first time, 2 to 3 mins) Set aside.


Since I had pieces from two whole chickens to fry, and only a small fryer, this allowed me to do the first frying before the guests showed up, and the quick second frying just as we were ready to eat.

It really is the same idea as with French Fries: first a long fry to cook through, then a quick fry to order to reheat and color.

Just when I thought I’d made up my mind!

This fried chicken was so worth the hassle of the triple dredge. The dreaded dredge haha! I wasted my time making Mac n cheese to go with it but next time I’m making a sticky Korean garlic sauce to go with it for sure.
 
2,486
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Joined Oct 9, 2008
Incidentally, the thing about buttermilk (or yoghurt, incidentally), is that it has lactic acid and some active cultures. The lactic acid is very gentle and will tenderize the meat without turning it to mush, even on a long marinating time. The active cultures (much more usual in yoghurt, these days) attack the way the meat is structured, leaving small pockets inside that the yoghurt--and whatever seasonings you've used--will penetrate. Some people claim this is a myth, but it's been proven conclusively by studying in an MRI what yoghurt does to chicken.

Salt can be added to the buttermilk/yoghurt, and you'll get the same sort of effect as from brining.

Tabasco can be added as well, but you do have to be careful about acid, or your meat can start to get mushy, taking on an unpleasant "pappy" sort of texture.
 
7,676
845
Joined Apr 3, 2008
I used a recipe from America’s test kitchen for gluten free chicken. It was my first time making it GF. There were three dredges

1. Cornstarch
2. Buttermilk/egg/baking soda/baking powder
3. Cornstarch/cornmeal and spices. I used mass harina, garlic powder, smoked paprika, and cayenne

After dredging I allowed it to sit for 30 minutes before frying in peanut oil.
 
5,716
578
Joined Sep 5, 2008
Don't hesitate to experiment with potato starch as well, it gives a very crispy coating.

Oh and I realized that YANG YEUM (Korean Fried Chicken) is always double fried. Says this blogger:

"Korean fried chicken (of course known locally as yang yeum) differs from typical American fried chicken by being fried twice. This results in the skin being crunchier and less greasy."

I'm going to make more fried chicken tonight. :)
 

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