does the practice of debearding apply to shucked oysters too?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by perfection, Feb 21, 2014.

  1. perfection

    perfection

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    I do understand that mussels need to be debearded before cooking and  service and also realize how the term debearding cam to be used - what i would like to know is whether oysters too are debearded ad if so what does this entail

    Thanks 
     
  2. soesje

    soesje

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    never had to debeard oysters at work….

    the mussels are cooked and when you don't debeard will influence the cooking liquid and not taste nice.
     
  3. someday

    someday

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    No. Oysters don't have a beard like mussels do. They should we washed and scrubbed clean under cold running water and stored with the curved side of the oyster on the bottom (or the flat side up if you prefer). 

    Some people put ice and a drip pan over them, some don't. I personally don't think it makes much of a difference either way, but some chefs think that the chlorine in the tap water is not good for the oysters. I've worked at different places that did both and really, neither seemed much better or worse than the other. 
     
  4. chris whitaker

    chris whitaker

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    Just a tip, When working with oysters, or clams that are about to be shucked it is important to not bang them around, unsettle them too much. Remember that there is a living thing in that shell tha is getting banged around and it will become nervous. A clam will clam up so to speak!

    Jostled around clams and oysters become harder to open.
     
  5. mike9

    mike9

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    Here's a tip on oysters - once they come out of the water keep them cold, or on ice for two weeks up to a month and they will absorb their liquor and plump up and the meat is very sweet yet still a little briny.  Much better tasting than fresh out of the water.  It pays to plan ahead  
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2014
  6. someday

    someday

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    Wait what? Who told you that? I've dealt with oysters in numerous high end professional kitchens, and I have never heard that oysters are better the older they get. 

    Oysters EAT themselves as they sit in the shell. After a little while they lose their juice and start to shrivel and die. I can see a couple days or maybe a week or two out of the water, but a month? Where did you get this info?
     
  7. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    Tip  clams can be opened real quick by putting in microwave for about 25 35 seconds depending on their size and no they wont cook. Oysters should be scrubbed dont let either sit in water from melting ice use a steamtable pan with holes in it. so water drains(same with fish dont let ice touch fish put a piece of plastic wrap on fish then ice on top. CHANGE AND ADD ICE DAILY
     
  8. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    Hey all ,really like it here in Georgia its not sticky hot and people are extremely courteous and friendly
     
  9. mike9

    mike9

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    A friend of mine from Wellfleet Mass who grows oysters and clams.  Believe me - side by side with a fresh one you will prefer the older.  They are plumper, juicier and sweeter there is no comparison and I doubt you could never provide me with a fresh, readily available one to convince me otherwise.  Pro environments are all about turnover and not about flavor in my experience.

    The notion that they eat themselves is silly - who told you that?
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2014
  10. chefross

    chefross

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    Hey Mike....I think your buddy was pulling your chain.

    This is so wrong in every way. Have YOU personally ever aged an oyster?

    Don't believe everything you hear and only half of what you see....

    Boy... now THAT should have gone in the thread of famous Chef quotes......
     
  11. mike9

    mike9

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    We eat them two weeks out of the water regularly when he comes up to hunt.  A month was the longest, but 70% still good.  Two - three weeks prime flavor and size. 
     
  12. chefross

    chefross

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    Perhaps this something done locally only.
    All of the research I looked into says the opposite of what your are claiming here.
    Most oysters build up toxic bacteria within a few days or so. From my experiences personally the opened older oysters are dried out and sickly looking.
     
  13. chefross

    chefross

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    WAIT!!!! Don't the shells contain minerals that cause the microwave to arch inside?  Never tried it cause of that fear.
     
  14. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    You could be right but I have not encountered it as of yet
     
  15. someday

    someday

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    Yeah I'm dubious myself. And oysters absolutely do eat themselves once out of the water...what else would sustain them for the days/weeks as they sit in the fridges? Any animal that is not getting food will eat their own bodies from the inside out. That is why they wither and dry up the longer they are out of the water. 

    I dunno, I've shucked thousands of oysters and have never found any evidence (empirical or otherwise) that says older is better.