Does the Chef have to be present when the State comes through to make their inspections?

61
14
Joined Apr 21, 2013
It's my day off.  My one day off in the past two weeks.  I'm the FDS of an assisted living facility.

State just arrived and everyone is in a panic.  My exec. director wants me to come in.  I told her I don't think it's necessary that I come in.

I feel pretty good about the condition of the kitchen.  I have my excellent lead cook in charge of the kitchen.  Of course, state being state, they are going to ding us.   But I do not think I need to be there... on my one day off.

Opinions?
 
4,474
422
Joined Jun 27, 2012
No but if I was the new head of department having problems with another director I would have gone anyway.

mimi

The less ammunition I could give her the better.
 
Last edited:
4,273
1,162
Joined Dec 18, 2010
If you don't go in you may want to update and polish your resume. Defying a bosses direct request is not a god idea. Being in a command position and not performing command functions is not a good idea.
 
Last edited:
4,474
422
Joined Jun 27, 2012
Is it the state or http://www.jointcommission.org/ ?

If the latter you should have been notified months in advance to get your ducks in a row.

If these people fail you Medicare reimbursement grinds to a halt until everything is fixed.

If you loose Medicare it is likely you loose all the other insurance payors as well.

mimi

If it is the State you may lose your Medicaid (or Obamacare) if things are not neat and shiny.

Do you trust your lead cook to answer all of the questions correctly?

m.

This is way more important than your local HD taking temps.

m.
 
Last edited:
43
11
Joined Apr 13, 2011
In my opinion you should be there. In any kitchen I run I am always there for inspections. One reason is to walk around d with the inspection crew or inspector.
 
61
14
Joined Apr 21, 2013
Crisis averted.  As I was getting ready to go in, I just got the call from my ED that it was just a routine complaint follow up, NOT the big yearly inspection, so I did not have to come in.

Thanks for everyone's responses.  I really appreciate this forum.
 
Last edited:
2
10
Joined Nov 30, 2015
As long as someone there has a food handlers or managers license besides yourself. If it is required by the company or state and everyone is current, then you have nothing to worry about. Inspectors mainly observe the persons working for safe and sanitary practices and food handling.
 
2,256
714
Joined Oct 31, 2012
I will suggest you use this as an opportunity to find out what you can be doing to get ready for the big annual inspection. 

       During my brief stint in an assisted living facility we had the annual big inspection. This caused a big scramble in the food service department. Apparently there were numerous practices we were supposed to be doing but since the FSD and Executive Chef had been hired just after the previous inspection and no one filled them in on the regulations, we had been doing none of them. 

I'm afraid I don't remember what those practices were but I"m sure you could find out easily enough. 
 

kuan

Moderator
Staff member
7,138
556
Joined Jun 11, 2001
In general you need to have at least one certified food manager on duty.
 
2
10
Joined Nov 30, 2015
"I will suggest you use this as an opportunity to find out what you can be doing to get ready for the big annual inspection"

I concur, consider it a wakeup call, you do not need a panicking kitchen when inspector is around.
 
4,474
422
Joined Jun 27, 2012
When you are dealing with insurance (most importantly Medicare in the rehab and retirement niche) the paper trail and safety measures are for the most part ridiculous.

The last JC inspector I dealt with had one of the house engineers drag a ladder behind her as she pushed the (drop) ceiling tiles out of place and looked for something or other dealing with mold.

Crazy lady.

mimi
 
Top Bottom