Does meat absorb "Marinade" FLAVORS after being cooked (Sous Vide)?

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Joined Aug 16, 2008
As a personal Chef, I have been using Sous Vide quite often as the results are ideal for Reheating Proteins.

I prefer to cook food without any seasoning and then rub afterwards especially for steak and chops.

I haven't been happy with the flavors of seasoned meats after 36 hour cooks.

This week I am preparing Pork Steaks with a mojo marinade. If I Sous Vide the meat and then season with the mojo spices will it penetrate the meat well enough if I leave it for say another 12 hours before searing? I know when it comes to smoking food and other cooking methods cooked meat absorbs those flavors differently after the meat is cooked, what about spices and acids? I m not concerned with the tenderization obviously, just the actual flavors.

Is there a science to apply here?

Thank you guys (and Ladies).
 
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Joined Apr 3, 2008
It's not that, it's just that I don't know the answer to your question so maybe others don't either.
 
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Joined May 5, 2010
When you Sous Vide, aren't you vacuum packing that which you are cooking in a plastic bag?

The vacuum process DOES allow for the marinade to penetrate the meat.

I have a Foodsaver machine and I marinade all kinds of food in large plastic containers then use the machine to suck out all the air.

If the marinades I use work in this system, it should be the same for Sous Vide no?
 
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Joined Aug 16, 2008
Yes to that.  I have just found that the flavors of the marinade don't hold up well to the extended co
ok times. More specifically the GARLIC hasn't held up well. I will be trying to marinate after the cook this week (mojo pork) and see how well it penetrates. We will see how well the flavor clings to the meat then.

Thank you.
 
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Joined May 11, 2013
You could just vacum the meat along with marinade, and let it absorb most of the spices in 24 to 48 hours, it depends on the meat cut. And than Sous Vide it ! It is a little bit harder if you first cook the meat and than put it in marinade, because  the spices will not go all the way throught the cut of the meat, because the protein is already coagulated.
 
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I guess I just never got on the "Sue Veed" boat. I can't figure out the attraction of cooking stuff so so long. Hey look ... I know you get really nice results, but you know what ... you can get really nice results by just regular cooking ... if you've got a clue. I also use quality ingredients so that I don't need to go overboard on outside flavorings. I would suggest just cooking the meat and making a really sauce of your marinade to go with. Therein you've got a nice quality piece of meat that diners can flavor the ever-loving bajeebies out of with your sauce/marinade/flavoring. YMMV however.
 
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Joined Jun 13, 2016
 
Yes to that.  I have just found that the flavors of the marinade don't hold up well to the extended co
ok times. More specifically the GARLIC hasn't held up well. I will be trying to marinate after the cook this week (mojo pork) and see how well it penetrates. We will see how well the flavor clings to the meat then.

Thank you.
Ahhhh, that explains it. I’d suggest that you experiment some more with adding seasonings to the sous-vide bag—except the garlic. 

Garlic is rather unique in that when it lets go of aromatic compounds during cooking, you’re happy to see them go. Some of these are sulfide gasses will give acrid flavors if trapped in the sous-vide bag. I forgot about this once and made a celeriac puree that tasted like a tire fire.

Other aromatics, especially herbs, work wonderfully. I find that with most herbs and other mirepoix kinds of aromatics, I can get away with using about half the usual amount. None of the flavor evaporates. 

I’d like to experiment more with garlic. Some people use garlic powder, which doesn’t appeal to me. Maybe if you blanch it, or lightly pre-cook it, you can get rid of the nasties before bagging them.

As far as your original question, i would assume that seasoning would migrate into cooked meat, possibly a bit faster than into raw meat (the structure is more open at this point). But it would take longer than is reasonable. I don’t see an upside, assuming you can figure out how to tame the garlic.
 
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What temperature and how long are the pork steaks cooking in the bath for? As mentioned above, the garlic does tend to release awful flavors. The longest I cooked garlic in a sous vide recipe was 1 hour at 85º C. The other components were chilis, cilantro root and oil. The garlic flavor preserved and the constant 85º temp allowed the garlic itself to mellow out. Sort of like when blanching it several times to create a mellow garlic puree.

Maybe you could fraction the time it cooks in the water bath. Raise the temp up a couple points and decrease the cooking time. Someone above mentioned just marinating it under pressure and then vaccing it again without the marinade.
 

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