Does anyone REALLY wash veggies with soap? Or is it just my compulsive husband?

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Potatoes have to be hand scrubbed inder water to remove some of the dirt. If you drop potatoes in boiling water without washing them, the water will be a mess. If you slice them and fry them unwashed, the bottom of the pan will turn into a gunky mess. If you peel a russet without washing it, your peeler will be chewing through dirt and crud that will dull the blade faster.

MOST of what I cook will be peeled/pithed/pitted/seeded/whaever anyway - so why bother, right?

    - Because if it hits the board dirty - all the clean insides will be as dirty as the outside as soon as the skin is broken.
 
I see your point when it comes to onions and garlic etc, I peel these on a paper towel and then they go on my board.  But when it comes to potatoes I put them in a big bowl and peel them (usually sitting infront of the tv watching a reality show) and then I was and dry each peeled potato to remove the dirt.  Your method is making me paraoid... I'm prone to being paranoid about such things. 
 
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To those who are worried about eating soap used to wash vegetables:  rinse it off thoroughly!

Soaps are used to dissolve fatty substances, like fat-soluble pesticides and waxes that seal in the pesticides on the surface of produce.  Once the soapy water has a chance to dissolve these, it is then rinsed away.  Soap is water soluble and easily rinses away, but pesticides are designed to be sticky (or are applied with sticky oils to make them stick).

Which would you rather have - a miniscule amount of soap residue that might not get thoroughly rinsed away, or the pesticides on the surfaces of your produce? 

If you are terrified of the soap residue, how do you deal with your dishes?  Soap contacts your dishes/silverware, then contacts your food.

Somebody made a comment about some pesticides penetrating to the flesh (inside) of the produce.  If some do, how does that make a difference to your decision to wash or not, with soap or not?  No water rinse is going to remove that pesticide inside the flesh of the produce, anyway.

The point of washing is to reduce contamination.  If soap helps remove some of the more fat-soluble pesticides, or helps scrubbing action physically remove more of the wax/pesticides, then why not use it and then rinse thoroughly?

Myself, I wash firm produce with soapy water for 30-60 seconds, scrubbing with a brush/cloth/my hands, then rinse thoroughly.

Mushrooms - I buy salad mushrooms with tightly closed gill sheets and dump them in a bowl of clean water (no soap!) and swish them quickly for a few seconds, then drain away the dirty water.  Doesn't work with more exotic shroomies, so those are on a case-by-case basis.

Tender greens - usually get a good soak in clean (no soap) water with some agitation of the bowl and stirring around to gently encourage some physical removal. 

Stout greens (like kale) get soaked in water with a little soap, well agitated/stirred, and then drained and rinsed several times.

My wife used to use a little peroxide in the water (no soap), and then rinsed.  I usually got headaches afterwards, so she stopped doing it.  Maybe I'm just hypersensitive to peroxide.  BTW, she also thinks it's weird that I use soap to wash veggies!
 
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BGL

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I just rinse veggies in water. Not sure I want my cucumbers to taste like soap.
I'm the cook here, but my husband helps by washing all fruits and vegs beforehand. He uses soap - as in Ivory soap. For him, it's about removing any pesticides or preservatives that were sprayed on, and I get that. It's also to ensure cleanliness from all of the handling, from farm to our table. I get that, too. But truth be known... when he's not looking, I just rinse really, really well. What do you do?

I wash my grapes every night with a little detergent in a sink with water, I then rinse them properly with water. I want my fruit clean from all the crap that they put on it by the time it gets to the supermarket.
 
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Too many comments to go through but if it hasn't already been mentioned there are lemon oil cleansers made for food use.
 

BGL

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Joined Dec 15, 2017
To those who are worried about eating soap used to wash vegetables: rinse it off thoroughly!

Soaps are used to dissolve fatty substances, like fat-soluble pesticides and waxes that seal in the pesticides on the surface of produce. Once the soapy water has a chance to dissolve these, it is then rinsed away. Soap is water soluble and easily rinses away, but pesticides are designed to be sticky (or are applied with sticky oils to make them stick).

Which would you rather have - a miniscule amount of soap residue that might not get thoroughly rinsed away, or the pesticides on the surfaces of your produce?

If you are terrified of the soap residue, how do you deal with your dishes? Soap contacts your dishes/silverware, then contacts your food.

Somebody made a comment about some pesticides penetrating to the flesh (inside) of the produce. If some do, how does that make a difference to your decision to wash or not, with soap or not? No water rinse is going to remove that pesticide inside the flesh of the produce, anyway.

The point of washing is to reduce contamination. If soap helps remove some of the more fat-soluble pesticides, or helps scrubbing action physically remove more of the wax/pesticides, then why not use it and then rinse thoroughly?

Myself, I wash firm produce with soapy water for 30-60 seconds, scrubbing with a brush/cloth/my hands, then rinse thoroughly.

Mushrooms - I buy salad mushrooms with tightly closed gill sheets and dump them in a bowl of clean water (no soap!) and swish them quickly for a few seconds, then drain away the dirty water. Doesn't work with more exotic shroomies, so those are on a case-by-case basis.

Tender greens - usually get a good soak in clean (no soap) water with some agitation of the bowl and stirring around to gently encourage some physical removal.

Stout greens (like kale) get soaked in water with a little soap, well agitated/stirred, and then drained and rinsed several times.

My wife used to use a little peroxide in the water (no soap), and then rinsed. I usually got headaches afterwards, so she stopped doing it. Maybe I'm just hypersensitive to peroxide. BTW, she also thinks it's weird that I use soap to wash veggies!

I agree 100%. If soap was poison, then they will pit a a "poison" sticker on it and warn people about it. When my kids were babies they used to have a bath and actually drink the soapy water. And what about the people who wash their dishes and don't rinse them? they just leave them to dry or they dry it with a dish cloth.
 
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Well household cleaners aren't the best thing for you, and the surface of veggie matter is rather absorbent, but food-grade cleaners are cheap enough considering how little you use. A $7 spray bottle would last me several months.

I used to soak leaf stuff in salted water, but gave that up when I went organic here, worth the additional 25% cost.

You should know all root veggies suck their pesticides and herbacides right up into the flesh, there is no way of cleaning them or skinning them to rid you of this. What goes into potatoes is particularly noxious. The only remedy is to buy organic there, really very much worth the extra 25%.
 
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