Does anyone know of a less acidic vinegar but not apple or rice?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by bj1bp2, Aug 7, 2010.

  1. bj1bp2

    bj1bp2

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    I have a great B-B-Q sauce recipe from my Dad but the vinegar,white distilled, is getting to be a little strong
     
  2. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Particular reason why no rice- or apple cider vinegar?

    About the only thing you can do is dilute the distilled white with some water, white wine, or, perhaps, beer. I just checked all my vinegars, and, with the exception of the rice vinegar, they're all either 5% or 6%. The rice vinegar has been factory diluted to 4.2%.

    Alternatively, any reason you can't up the sweetening agents to cut the acid taste?
     
  3. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    If you like the taste (or lack of it) of distilled vinegar, just cut the vinegar with water to whatever level of acidity you enjoy.  As a matter of fact, distilled vinegar is nothing but acetic acid diluted with water anyway.

    If you want to sound like a professional chef, don't say "water," say "profit."

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2010
  4. chefedb

    chefedb

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    BDL is right on   If wine vin ,you could cut with red wine. Apple cider vin with a bit apple juice , white vin  water, rice vin water and on and on > Most distilled vi is reduced with water to 5% acidity already.Some store brands less,  some more.
     
  5. philpbvc3232

    philpbvc3232

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    persimmon also can be made into vinegar,it is an ancient way in the east.
     
  6. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Many things can be made into vinegar; watermelon, for instance, is an old southern way. What's at issue here is the percentage of acetic acid.
     
  7. red0529

    red0529

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    I have just finished a Lemon Basil (Honey & Herb infused) Vinegar that had an acidity level of 4%.  It was very mild, slightly sweet, made by Melfor (Distributed by Viola Consulting LLC ,Fleetwood PA  tel. 800-334-6326). This is a french company.  Their website is www.melfor.com.  I'm not seeing that this particular one is available on their website.  Please let me know if you are able to find this or similar varieties/acid levels.